Nelson Mandela's grandson tells Meghan Markle to 'pull up her sleeves' if she wants to be anything like South African hero

Meghan Markle claims her wedding has drawn comparison to the scenes witnessed when Nelson Mandela walked free

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Nelson Mandela's grandson has launched a fresh attack on Meghan Markle and urged her to "pull up her sleeves" to do more for ordinary people.

Zwelivelile 'Mandla' Mandela spoke about the Duchess of Sussex's remarks about her wedding she made during an interview with The Cut, where she suggested that the scenes in South Africa were reminiscent of those seen during Madiba's walk to freedom.

Mandela's grandson said he was "surprised" after Meghan claimed that three years ago she was told by a live-action Lion King cast member that "we rejoiced in the streets the same we did when Mandela was freed from prison".

Speaking to The Times, he advised Meghan to "get out there, pull up your sleeves and better the lives of ordinary people in England and in the United Kingdom".

Zwelivelile 'Mandla' Mandela, an MP and chief of the late South African president’s Mvezo tribe since 2013, added that the Duchess of Sussex could do "a lot of good in the global community".

He said: "For the personality she is, she can do a lot of good in the global community by adopting the causes that Madiba championed."

Meghan Markle claims her wedding has been compared to Madiba's walk to freedom.
Meghan Markle claims her wedding has been compared to Madiba's walk to freedom.
Meghan Markle spoke about a variety of topics relating to the Royal Family in her interview with The Cut.
Meghan Markle spoke about a variety of topics relating to the Royal Family in her interview with The Cut.

The controversy arose following the Duchess of Sussex's interview with The Cut which surpassed 6,400 words, and gave a detailed account about an encounter she had at a 2019 premiere of a live-action version of Lion King.

She spoke about how a South African actor pulled her to one side and told her: "I just need you to know: When you married into this family, we rejoiced in the streets the same we did when Mandela was freed from prison."

Mandla has criticised the account given, saying it cannot be compared to Madiba's walk to freedom after 27 years of imprisonment.

He told MailOnline: "It can never be compared to the celebration of someone's wedding. Madiba's celebration was based on overcoming 350 years of colonialism with 60 years of a brutal apartheid regime in South Africa. So It cannot be equated to as the same."

The Duchess also spoke about the current status of her relationship with the Royal Family after she opted to abandon royal duties along with the Duke of Sussex.

Journalist Allison P Davis asked Meghan if there was room for forgiveness between her, the Royal Family and her own family.

Meghan said: “I think forgiveness is really important. It takes a lot more energy to not forgive.

“But it takes a lot of effort to forgive. I’ve really made an active effort, especially knowing that I can say anything.”

She added: “I have a lot to say until I don’t. Do you like that? Sometimes, as they say, the silent part is still part of the song.”

Meghan told the publication: “It’s interesting, I’ve never had to sign anything that restricts me from talking.

“I can talk about my whole experience and make a choice not to.”

Asked why she does not talk, Meghan replied: “Still healing.”