Neil Oliver brands universities decolonising curriculums as one of 'stupidest ideas academia has ever had'

The GB News Presenter said courses were "falling short" if they don't teach literature which "shocks you or confronts you with challenging ideas"

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GB News Presenter Neil Oliver has slammed attempts by universities to decolonise the curriculum in an interview with Colin Brazier, saying "if that's not the stupidest idea that academia has ever had, I would say it's definitely in the top one."

The archaeologist reacted to Stirling University announcing they would "decolonise the curriculum" and replace Jane Austen with award-winning writer Toni Morrison.

Stirling University's English Literature programme has updated the syllabus to "contribute increased diversity."

Neil Oliver reacted to Stirling University announcing they would "decolonise the curriculum"
Neil Oliver reacted to Stirling University announcing they would "decolonise the curriculum"

Neil Oliver criticised the decision about whether it is dangerous to cancel uncomfortable history from university curriculums.

The Scottish television presenter said: "This is all part of a bigger picture in which everything about being British, British culture and heritage, our history and the history of empire is being portrayed always as a negative."

Mr Oliver warned: "It reaches it tentacles into academia.

"This whole idea of decolonising the curriculums, if that's not the stupidest idea that academia has ever had, I would say it's definitely in the top one."

Colin Brazier referenced trigger warnings being added to books such as 1984 and Charles Dickens' Oliver Twist.

Mr Oliver said: "There are trigger warnings where students of English Literature are being forewarned that depending on what they read, they might come across 'colonial violence'."

"If some of the world's literature doesn't shock you or confront you with challenging ideas or bring you close to close with ideas you've never had or disagree with then I am afraid the course is falling short."

The history book author reflected on Stirling University's decision: "Why would you take out a figure as influential as Jane Austen? Why don't you bring more characters in so Austen would be read alongside Toni Morrison? Surely that broadens the picture."