MPs set for £2,200 pay hike as Brits face soaring energy and gas bills

The Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority (IPSA) announced the plans to up pay for Members of Parliament in 2022-23 after it was frozen for two years during the Covid-19 pandemic.

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MPs are set to receive a substantial £2,200 pay hike next month, it has been revealed.

The Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority (IPSA) announced the plans to up pay for Members of Parliament in 2022-23 after it was frozen for two years during the Covid-19 pandemic.

As the country is plunged into a cost of living crisis, the rise from £81,932 to £84,144 is likely to cause anger.

Independent watchdog IPSA were set up in the wake of the MPs' expenses scandal, and are tasked with setting the pay for the individuals who represent UK constituencies in Parliament.

The rise is based on a calculation on the average change in salaries for public sector workers in the last year.

In January, No 10 raised concerns over MPs receiving potential pay rises, calling for "constraint" from IPSA, as the public begin to live with rising energy costs.

The Prime Minister's spokesman said: “I would say that would we would expect restraint on matters like this given current circumstances but beyond that I think it is right that we let IPSA set out the proposals as an independent body".

PM Boris Johnson is likely to face scrutiny over whether he will accept a pay rise himself. His spokesman said on the issue in January: "I’m simply saying they haven’t set out any detail yet so I wouldn’t wish to comment while that independent process is taking place.

"Beyond that we would expect to see restraint on these issues".

Richard Lloyd, IPSA’s Chair, told the Mirror: “This is the first increase in pay for MPs in two years and follows the average of increases across the public sector last year. MPs play a vital role in our democracy and this is reflected in their pay".

He added: "It is right that MPs are paid fairly for the responsibility and the unseen work they do helping their constituents, which dramatically increased last year.

"For Parliament to reflect society, it is vital that people from all walks of life can be an MP".