Monkeypox cases in UK rise to 71 as 14 confirmed in England

The number of cases is up from a total of 57 reported across the UK yesterday

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The number of confirmed cases of monkeypox in the UK has risen to 71, with 14 new cases identified in England, the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) said.

It brings the total number of cases in England to 70, while one has been reported in Scotland so far.

As of May 23, no cases have been identified in Wales or Northern Ireland, the UKHSA added.

Monkeypox cases in the UK has risen to 71
Monkeypox cases in the UK has risen to 71
Symptoms include fever, headache, muscle aches, backache, swollen lymph nodes, chills and exhaustion
Symptoms include fever, headache, muscle aches, backache, swollen lymph nodes, chills and exhaustion

Dr Susan Hopkins, chief medical adviser at the UKHSA, said: “We are continuing to promptly identify further monkeypox cases in England through our extensive surveillance and contact tracing networks, our vigilant NHS services and thanks to people coming forward with symptoms.

“If anyone suspects they might have rashes or lesions on any part of their body, particularly if they have recently had a new sexual partner, they should limit their contact with others and contact NHS 111 or their local sexual health service as soon as possible, though please phone ahead before attending in person.”

While the virus has also been discovered in several countries across Europe, including Spain, Portugal and France.

The source of monkeypox investigations in parts of Europe is being linked to parties in the Canary Islands.

Portuguese authorities believe the first cases in the country came from a man who attended parties in the Canary Islands in April and May.

Reports link the transmission of the disease to other parties in the Canary Islands, namely Pride Maspolamas, an event that was attended by 80,000 people and which took place between May 5 and May 15.

Symptoms include fever, headache, muscle aches, backache, swollen lymph nodes, chills and exhaustion.

A rash can develop, often beginning on the face, which then spreads to other parts of the body including the genitals.