Millions of benefit claimants could be due up to £1,500 in backdated payments

Four claimants on legacy benefits will have their case against the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) heard next month

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Millions of people who earn legacy benefits could be owed backdated payments worth £1,500 if an appeal at the High Court is successful.

Four claimants on legacy benefits will have their case against the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) heard next month.

The claimants feel they are eligible to get back payments due to the lack of support afforded to them during the Covid pandemic.

A £20 a week uplift was handed out through the pandemic to help millions on Universal Credit.

Despite this, nearly two million households relying on the legacy benefits scheme were excluded from this help.

Many of those entitled to legacy benefits were left disappointed by being excluded to the held afforded to those of Universal Credit.
Many of those entitled to legacy benefits were left disappointed by being excluded to the held afforded to those of Universal Credit.

Among those left out of pocket included people claiming personal independence payments (PIP) or employment support allowance (ESA) and disabled people.

The claimants stated in court that the treatment afforded to them was unfair and they should receive the same amount of money, but the case was lost in February this year.

But the legal team, Osbornes Law, have confirmed they have won the right to appeal the decision in August.

The case will now be heard in the Court of Appeal on December 6 or 7, according to The Independent.

Despite this, there is no guarantee of a payout should the appeal be successful.

The DWP would have to make amends in some form, but there are many ways this could potentially be done.

One avenue it may take is a back dated payment to those affected, worth potentially up to £1,560.

This would be equal to the 12-month uplift from March 2020, plus the £560 paid out through the six-month extension to the end of September.

Even if the decision is overturned, it is likely that the DWP will take time in selecting their next course of action.

A Department for Work and Pensions spokesperson told The Sun: “It would not be appropriate for us to comment while the litigation is ongoing.

"It has always been the case that claimants on legacy benefits can make a claim for Universal Credit if they believe they will be better off.”