Migrant crisis: Tory MP warns violence in local communities is INEVITABLE - 'Adverse effects!'

David Morris MP spoke about being given 'two hours notice' about 80 or so migrants going into a hotel in Markham

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VIOLENCE in local communities caused soaring numbers of incoming migrants is all but inevitable, a Tory MP has suggested.

David Morris, MP for Morecambe and Lunesdale, told GB News: “I was given two hours notice at 7am on Saturday morning, saying that 80 or so migrants were going to be going into a hotel, literally in the centre in the west end of Markham.

“I ended up texting the minister and, to be truthful and fair, we were sorting it out from that moment. On Sunday afternoon I had a high level meeting with the officials at the Home Office and we got that sorted out, and that it's a temporary state lasting only a matter of weeks.

“Now, of course, you know I wasn't born yesterday and I'm watching this with bated breath. I am monitoring this and I am looking for further meetings with the ministers.”

Asked by Patrick Christys if violence was inevitable as numbers grow, he said: “We are a welcoming society…we're very welcoming in the Markham area.

“But it's like anything, if you've got such a dramatic disruption, very quick, dramatic disruption on this scale, it is going to have adverse effects in the local community, both with people who live there as well as the people who you're hosting.

Suella Braverman has pledged to tackle the migrant crisis.
Suella Braverman has pledged to tackle the migrant crisis.

“My concern was the fact that they were just literally dropped on our doorstep.”

He added: “People are very concerned about this. The problem that we have here is we've got a lot of illegal immigration and organised crime assisting that.

“We've also got the post-Brexit era where, even though we've left the EU, we've not left Europe in effect, but we have interests, relations, shall we say with our neighbours, and our European neighbours.

“So we really do have to change our laws in the UK, and make sure that they work for us but that is a big problem of trying to get those laws recognised on the other side of the Channel.”

Mr Morris told GB News: “Because we're not in the EU anymore, it is going to be a very hard task to do that. And I think that if you're looking at what the Immigration Minister wants to do and the Home Secretary, they want to amend certain laws that we've already got and I think that's the best way ahead.

“The main thing that we have to start to do is to start deporting people who are coming across here illegally as quickly as possible and not have the legal backlog that slows it up.

“We have got a serious problem here in the UK. Sadly, it's been exacerbated by people who want to come here because they want a better life, and you can't blame them for that.

“What you've got at the end of the day is people coming from other countries through five or six different countries getting in and claiming asylum, which is not exactly what the spirit of asylum is about.”