Meghan and Harry's children Archie and Lilibet become prince and princess

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's children, Archie and Lilibet Mountbatten-Windsor, can now be known as Prince Archie and Princess Lilibet

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The Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s son Archie Mountbatten-Windsor is now technically a prince due to rules set out by King George V in 1917.

When Archie was born he was too far down the line of succession for such a title according to George V’s restrictions, but now, as the son of a son of a sovereign, he can be an HRH and a prince.

Archie was allowed to become Earl of Dumbarton – one of the Duke’s subsidiary titles – when he was born, or could have been known as Lord Archie Mountbatten-Windsor.

But Buckingham Palace said his parents had decided he should be plain Master Archie instead.

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry
Meghan Markle and Prince Harry
Queen Elizabeth II died on Thursday
Queen Elizabeth II died on Thursday

In the Sussexes’ bombshell Oprah interview, Meghan claimed Archie was not made a prince because of his race – even though George V’s rules meant he was not entitled to be one.

In 2021, it was suggested Charles – in a bid to limit the number of key royals – intended, when he became king, to prevent Archie becoming a prince.

To do so, he will have to issue a Letters Patent amending Archie’s right to be a prince. Until that potentially happens, Archie remains a prince, whether his parents choose to use the title or not.

If it does not happen, Archie continues to technically be HRH Prince Archie of Sussex.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s titles will not change.

The couple have stopped using their HRH styles, but they still retain them.

Archie’s younger sister Lilibet “Lili” Mountbatten-Windsor is now technically a princess.

If she uses the title, she will be HRH Princess Lili of Sussex. Like Archie, Charles would have to issue a Letters Patent to remove this.