Man who broke world press-up record opens up about ‘Sudden Cardiac Death Syndrome’ to Nigel Farage

The chemical weapons expert joined Farage on GB News to discuss his career and personal life

Published

Hamish De Bretton-Gordon has opened up to Nigel Farage about what it is like living with "Sudden Cardiac Death syndrome".

The chemical weapons expert joined Farage on GB News to discuss his career and personal life.

When quizzed on living with the condition Mr De Bretton-Gordon shared his experience with SCD, which is described as a sudden death caused by loss of function in the heart, he said: "Most things in my life are vaguely amusing and vaguely offbeat.

"I’m a very fit person, I broke the world press-up record a few years ago, 4,489 in three hours.

"I used to run army rowing. I’m a rubbish but very keen rower.

"Just like Eriksen, Fabrice Muamba, other sufferers of this. It tends to be people like us who are super fit, this thing is right on the margin. If something triggers it, it can be terminal."

The chemical weapons expert joined Farage on GB News to discuss his career and personal life.
The chemical weapons expert joined Farage on GB News to discuss his career and personal life.
Christian Eriksen suffered a cardiac arrest at Euro 2020 after collapsing during Denmark’s opening game against Finland in Copenhagen on June 12, 2021.
Christian Eriksen suffered a cardiac arrest at Euro 2020 after collapsing during Denmark’s opening game against Finland in Copenhagen on June 12, 2021.

Christian Eriksen suffered a cardiac arrest at Euro 2020 after collapsing during Denmark’s opening game against Finland in Copenhagen on June 12, 2021.

Eriksen was quickly put on his side by teammate Simon Kjaer to ensure his airway was open and a defibrillator was produced quickly.

Eriksen was revived on the pitch although he was technically dead for a few minutes before he was carried to an ambulance and taken to hospital.

Mr De Bretton-Gordon also urged people to show their support for those who suffer with the condition, saying that if it is recognised it can be treated and prevented from happening, adding: "I’m campaigning very hard for the British Heart Foundation and Cardiomyopathy UK.

"Whenever you hear of a young boy or girl who has died on a sports pitch, it’s generally this.

"If you know you’ve got it… I now have a defibrillator, I still run everyday and if something happens this thing will save my life.

"If you know about it you can do something about it."