Man suing Gerry Adams over IRA allegations recalls 'massive terrorist bomb which killed two friends'

In an exclusive interview with GB News presenter Arlene Foster, Jonathan Ganesh shed light on the looming civil case against Gerry Adams

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Former Sinn Fein president Gerry Adams is to face legal action in the London High Court by three victims of IRA terror attacks in Great Britain.

Victims of the attacks in Manchester and the Docklands in 1996 and the Old Bailey car bombing in 1973 are seeking damages of £1 in a landmark case.

They claim Mr Adams "directed a series of IRA bombings as a senior member, if not the leader, of PIRA [Provisional Irish Republican Army] between 1973 and 1996".

A spokesman for the former Sinn Féin leader said, "Mr Adams rejects the claims made in the notice of legal action. His solicitor will deal with it."

In an exclusive interview with GB News presenter Arlene Foster, President of the Docklands Victims Association, Jonathan Ganesh, outlined his relation to the 1996 Docklands terror attack.

He said: "I was working as a part time security officer in the Docklands, working my way through college, and there was a massive terrorist bomb which killed my two friends.

Arlene Foster spoke with Johnathan Ganesh
Arlene Foster spoke with Johnathan Ganesh

"It's something which I will never forget.

"It still haunts me to this day, but there's many other people in the Docklands and throughout Northern Ireland and mainland UK who suffered very similar experiences."

The 1996 terror attack on the Docklands killed two and injured over 100 workers. The former security officer sustained severe burns and scars following the incident.

He continued: "My two friends Inam Bashir and John Jeffries, who ran the local newspaper kiosk selling sweets to the children, they were actually killed and their bodies were extremely badly damaged."

Mr Ganesh and others pursuing the claims are seeking a nominal damages fee of just £1 in the case, with the action being funded through CrowdJustice, an online fundraising platform specifically designed for legal action.

The other claimants bringing the legal case against Mr Adams are John Clark, a former police officer who was injured in the Old Bailey bombing in 1973, and Barry Laycock, a rail worker injured by the truck bomb detonated in Manchester in June 1996.

Describing the intentions of the £1 nominal damages fee, the President of the Docklands Victims Association said: "It's not about the money, it's about principal.

"It's about bringing some sort of closure to the victims."

Former Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams attending the launch of Feile an Phobail, also known as the West Belfast Festival at St Mary's College, Belfast.
Former Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams attending the launch of Feile an Phobail, also known as the West Belfast Festival at St Mary's College, Belfast.
President of the Docklands Victims Association Jonathan Ganesh
President of the Docklands Victims Association Jonathan Ganesh

Progressing the discussion, Mr Ganesh noted the Government's plans to introduce a statute of limitations to end all prosecutions related to the Troubles before 1998 to stop Northern Ireland being "hamstrung by its past".

Following the announcements, he added how he feels the Government may "bulldoze" the policy through preventing their trial.

The 1996 attack abruptly ended the IRA ceasefire, which had been agreed two years prior.

Damage caused by the bomb amassed £150million.

One bomber was given 25 years in jail, but was freed after serving two.

Since starting the funding campaign on CrowdJustice earlier this year, over £15,000 has been contributed towards the trial.

Barrister James Crespi being led away, wounded and bandaged, after being hurt by an IRA bomb outside the Old Bailey in 1973
Barrister James Crespi being led away, wounded and bandaged, after being hurt by an IRA bomb outside the Old Bailey in 1973

Thanking the public for their donations, the terror attack survivor said: "We were astonished by the generosity of people, within hours we received amazing donations, and emails from Northern Ireland as well as mainland UK really getting behind this and supporting us, and that was very touching.

"It gave us that renewed confidence that we are doing the right thing."

Mr Ganesh added: "Terrorism is one of the worst atrocities in humanity."

The President of the Docklands Victim Association brought up the atrocity which plagued Arlene's family, when the IRA tried to murder her late father John, a farmer and reserve police officer.

Concluding his comments, Mr Ganesh said: "Our case goes deeper – to send the message to every terrorist around the world that 'listen you will be held to account.'"

Mr Adams was held on suspicion of IRA membership twice in the 1970s, but has never been prosecuted.

In 2014, he was questioned for four days by police investigating the murder of Jean McConville, a 37-year-old widow, and mum-of-ten who was abducted from her Belfast home in 1972, shot, and secretly buried.

Mr Adams was released without charge.

Matthew Jury, of the law firm McCue Jury & Partners, who is representing the three claimants, said: “It’s an opportunity for Mr Adams to give his full and honest account of his part in The Troubles.

"If not, then it will be for the court to decide what role he played.”

Mr Adams has always denied ever being in the IRA.