Lindsay Hoyle warns MPs ‘don’t damage the furniture’ as cheers ring out during Rishi Sunak’s first PMQs as PM

As Mr Sunak stood up to make his opening remarks, loud cheers could be heard from the backbenches

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Sir Lindsay Hoyle has warned MPs not to “damage the furniture” as they cheered for Rishi Sunak during his first Prime Minister’s Questions as PM.

As Mr Sunak stood up to make his opening remarks, loud cheers could be heard from the backbenches.

But with some seemingly clapping their hands on the furniture, the House of Commons speaker issued a warning.

Sir Lindsay said: “Can I just say, don’t damage the furniture.”

Sir Lindsay Hoyle warned MPs not to 'damage the furniture' as they cheered for Rishi Sunak
Sir Lindsay Hoyle warned MPs not to 'damage the furniture' as they cheered for Rishi Sunak

Before continuing: “Cheer him by all means but don’t damage, come on!”

As PMQs began, Sir Keir Starmer welcomed Mr Sunak to the Commons after he was officially appointed Prime Minister on Wednesday.

He added it was a “significant moment in our national story” that Mr Sunak was the first Prime Minister of South Asian descent, before quickly questioning the re-appointment of Suella Braverman as Home Secretary.

Rishi Sunak
Rishi Sunak

Former PM Liz Truss forced Ms Braverman out last week after she breached the ministerial code by sending an official document to a Tory backbencher from a personal email.

Ms Braverman, who had been in the role six weeks, said she made a “mistake” which she conceded was a “technical infringement” of the rules.

But questions remain about why she sent the document to fellow right-winger Sir John Hayes and how she accidentally copied in an aide to another MP, who sounded the alarm.

Sir Keir asked: “Was his Home Secretary right to resign last week for a breach of security?”

Mr Sunak replied: “The Home Secretary made an error of judgment, but she recognised that, she raised the matter and she accepted her mistake.

“That is why I was delighted to welcome her back into a united cabinet that brings experience and stability to the heart of Government.”

Mr Sunak also accused Sir Keir’s Labour of being soft on crime.

Sir Keir in his concluding remarks, said Mr Sunak is “not on the side of working people” before adding: “That’s why the only time he ran in a competitive election he got trounced by the former prime minister, who herself got beaten by a lettuce.

“So why doesn’t he put it to the test, let working people have their say and call a general election?”

Mr Sunak replied: “He talks about mandates, about votes, about elections, it’s a bit rich coming from the person who tried to overturn the biggest democratic vote in our country’s history.

“Our mandate is based on the manifesto that we were elected on – to remind him, an election we won and they lost.