Lewis Hamilton slammed by FIA President for 'imposing beliefs on fans'

The former F1 world champion is known for vocally supporting various causes

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Formula 1 stars Lewis Hamilton and Sebastian Vettel have been slammed by the sport's governing body for their human rights campaigning.

The president of the body, Mohammed ben Sulayem, has criticised the pair for "imposing their beliefs" on people through F1.

When asked about what the sport "should not become" in an interview, the FIA president cited the pair.

Lewis Hamilton has caused controversy in the past for wearing LGBTQ+ helmets in Middle East countries for races.
Lewis Hamilton has caused controversy in the past for wearing LGBTQ+ helmets in Middle East countries for races.

He told GrandPrix247 : "Niki Lauda and Alain Prost only cared about driving. Now, Vettel drives a rainbow bicycle, Lewis is passionate about human rights and [Lando] Norris addresses mental health.

"Everybody has the right to think. To me, it is about deciding whether we should impose our believes in something over the sport all the time.

Sebastian Vettel has often used his platform to call for climate change action.
Sebastian Vettel has often used his platform to call for climate change action.

Lewis Hamilton has been known to champion multiple causes, including LGBTQ+ during races in the Middle East, a region highly criticised by the community.David Davies

"I am from an Arabian culture. I am international and Muslim. I do not impose my beliefs on other people? No way! Never. If you look at my operation in the UAE: 16 nationalities! Name me one federation that has that many nationalities.

"On top, there are more than 34% women and 7 religions. And even more Christians than Muslims. I am proud because it creates credibility and merit. But do I go and pose my beliefs? No. The rules are there, even now there are issues when it comes to – for example- jewellery, I didn’t write that."

Ben Sulayem continued by explaining that he hopes the sport will champion "neutrality" as it has become "too political".

The two former world champions are known for championing various causes.
The two former world champions are known for championing various causes.

He said: "We have it in our FIA status 'neutrality' but I think some people only see neutrality and guidance when it suits them.

"For me, I come from that black or white world and it is very hard to do it. When it is governance, it has to be governance, when it is neutrality, it has to be neutrality.

"We are therefore for one reason and one reason only, and that is sports.

"Now you have to be political sometimes, but not really be a politician. Where do you have the balance? The FIA should be careful not to be dragged into politics without forgetting our roots of motorsports."

The FIA chief faced a backlash for his comments from F1 fans, prompting him to justify his statement on Twitter, saying: "As a driver, I have always believed in sport as a catalyst of progress in society.

"That is why promoting sustainability, diversity and inclusion is a key priority of my mandate. In the same way, I value the commitment of all drivers and champions for a better future."