Lewis Hamilton climbs down on FIA argument by agreeing to remove nose stud

The seven-time F1 world champion had vowed not to remove his nose piercing when previously asked

Published

Mercedes driver Lewis Hamilton has performed a u-turn and agreed to remove his nose piercing.

Hamilton, 37, argued that he would withdraw from races if asked to remove the nose stud, which he was previously granted a medical exemption for it being difficult to remove.

He even threatened to wear four watches in protest at what he sees as an unnecessary law.

But the British F1 driver appears to have had a change of heart, with the FIA confirming it would be removed in time for Silverstone.

If Hamilton had not removed the piercing, he faced a fine or even a points deduction.

Lewis Hamilton
Lewis Hamilton
Mercedes' Lewis Hamilton arrives for a press conference ahead of the British Grand Prix 2022 at Silverstone, Towcester
Mercedes' Lewis Hamilton arrives for a press conference ahead of the British Grand Prix 2022 at Silverstone, Towcester

Hamilton has found himself at the centre of a racism storm this week after comments from former world champion Nelson Piquet resurfaced ahead of the British Grand Prix.

Piquet used a racial insult to refer to Hamilton and his collision with arch-rival Max Verstappen last year.

The comments have led to calls for Piquet to be suspended from all Formula One events.

Piquet, whose daughter is the girlfriend of Verstappen, has since said his comments were not racist as the term he used is non-offensive in his native Brazil, and apologised for any offence caused.

Nelson Piquet insists he wasn't being racist
Nelson Piquet insists he wasn't being racist
Kelly Piquet and Max Verstappen
Kelly Piquet and Max Verstappen

This led Lewis to question why "older voices" were still being given a platform and that "archaic views" have to change.

He said: "I've been on the receiving end of racism, criticism, negativity, archaic narratives and undertones of discrimination for a long, long time, and there's nothing really particularly new for me.

"It's more about the bigger picture.

"I don't know why we are continuing to give these older voices a platform.

"They're speaking upon our sport and we're looking to go somewhere completely different. If we're looking to grow in the US, other countries, South Africa, we need to look to the future and give the younger people a platform, who are more representative of today's time.

"It's not just about one individual, it's not about the one use of that term, it's the bigger picture."