King Charles III's 'relentless' daily routine that involves skipping a meal revealed

King Charles III has typically carried out around 500 engagements a year during his long stint as a working royal

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King Charles III's former press secretary has lifted the lid on the monarch's "relentless" lifestyle that includes him often having to skip lunch.

In a typical year, the King would typically carry out around 500 engagements, some 200 jointly with Queen Consort.

With the couple about to embark on their greatest challenge yet following the death of Queen Elizabeth II, their lifestyles are unlikely to ease.

The new King's life is set to be planned hour by hour, little change from what he was used to before.

King Charles III is said to be interested in all people and their interests during his royal engagements
King Charles III is said to be interested in all people and their interests during his royal engagements
King Charles III is reportedly a frequent skipper of meals due to his 'relentless' lifestyle
King Charles III is reportedly a frequent skipper of meals due to his 'relentless' lifestyle

According to the King's former press secretary Julian Payne, the royal leads a "relentless" lifestyle, meaning Payne's line of work would lead to him having to skip meals and frequently have big breakfasts in order to make up for the lack of lunch.

He said: "The King doesn’t eat lunch — so, an early lesson I learnt when out on the road with him was to have a big breakfast or bring a few snack bars to keep you going."

Mr Payne adds that the King's interest in people was something that stuck with him following his departure from the role.

King Charles III's engagements are said to often "overrun" due to his willingness to listen to people.

He said: "Throughout these visits, the thing that struck me was how interested the King is in everything and everyone he meets.

"Because of this, his conversations almost always overran.

"I frequently saw people try to impress him with their intellectual prowess or social standing, to little effect.

"He doesn’t draw a distinction between the well-heeled and those who have the toughest of lives.

"He’s interested in people, not position," he told The Sun.