Kellie Maloney urges trans women to 'accept they're not biological women' and are 'medically constructed'

Everyone should have the opportunity to take part in the sport they choose, the former boxing promoter said

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Transgender boxing promoter Kellie Maloney has urged transgender women to accept that they are not "biological women" and are "medically constructed".

As part of a GB News discussion on whether transgender women should compete in female sports, she said: "We have to accept we’re not biological women, we’re medically constructed women”.

Ms Maloney said she couldn't give her verdict on the controversial sports debate, but that more research was needed on whether trans women have a medical or physical advantage over naturally born women.

She said: “The sports government body should all get together and organise a proper testing series on trans women because they just take the average man and use him and the average women, well they’re not athletes."

Referring to multiple doping scandals, she said on GB News “I believe everyone should have the opportunity to take part in the sport they choose, but let's be fair, sport is not a level playing anyway.”

Kellie Maloney speaking on GB News
Kellie Maloney speaking on GB News
Lia Thomas swims the 100 free at the NCAA Swimming & Diving Championships
Lia Thomas swims the 100 free at the NCAA Swimming & Diving Championships

Her comments come after the controversial swimming event this week where US swimmer Lia Thomas became the first transgender athlete to be crowned National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) champion.

It sparked widespread debate over whether trans women have a physical or medical advantage and allowing them to compete could threaten the integrity of women's sport.

Presenter Isabel Webster brought up former British Olympian Sharon Davies, a high-profile figure in the debate, and has been outspoken in her opinion that women need to be protected in sport.

She's called on sports journalists, trainers, past and present competitors and anyone who follows sports to "be strong" and call out the "injustice".

Speaking on Twitter she said: "If you’re an athlete, coach, retired athlete, sporting official, sports journalist or sports enthusiast & keeping your head down, ignoring this injustice, shame on you.. you are partly responsible for all those from now on that lose their places, medals & opportunities. Be strong."

Labour equalities minister Charlotte Nichols came to the swimmer's defence after her win and congratulated her on her achievement.

She wrote: "As a former competitive swimmer myself, indeed, I know full well how much training is required for a title like this.

"Anyone trying to diminish Lia Thomas' achievement because of lazy transphobia should frankly pipe down.

"Huge congratulations to her."