John Bercow could face life-ban from Parliament as bullying probe set to be published

Mr Bercow was accused of bullying and intimidation as well as sexually discriminatory remarks

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John Bercow, former Speaker of the House of Commons, could face a life-ban from Parliament today as he awaits the conclusion of an inquiry into bullying allegations.

Mr Bercow has been accused of “bullying and intimidation” behind closed doors which he categorically denies.

The findings from the Commons investigations into the allegations are set to be published on Tuesday morning.

If Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards, Kathryn Stone, finds him guilty, Mr Bercow could be temporarily or permanently banned from the Commons.

A panel will convene and reveal their verdict.

The allegations include swearing at officials, making racially and sexually discriminatory remarks and reports that he once threw a mobile phone.

Accusations came from three House of Commons members of staff including Robert Lisvane, the former clerk of the Commons, and private secretaries Kate Emms and Angus Sinclair.

Mr Bercow earlier this year denounced the inquiry as a “kangaroo court” and branded it "protracted, amateurish and unjust" as he said he had been found guilty of 21 counts out of 35.

He has consistently denied any claims of bullying.

Mr Bercow insisted two years ago: “For the record, I categorically deny that I have ever bullied anyone anywhere at any time."

In an interview with the Sunday Times last year he said the investigations “stink”.

He added: “Am I a stiff-upper-lipped Englishman? No. Am I a model of calm and stoicism and imperturbability at all times? No. Can I get ratty? Yes. Am I sometimes overexcitable? Yes. Did I handle every situation in the chamber as I should have? No.

"I'm flawed. I sometimes wind people up unnecessarily. But I had hugely collegiate relations with my team."