Joe Biden wrongly claims his son Beau died in Iraq in bizarre blunder

The US President made the blunder while discussing various domestic issues in South Florida

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Joe Biden has mistakenly claimed his late son Beau died while serving in Iraq in a strange gaffe.

While discussing inflation, social security and healthcare in South Florida on Tuesday evening, the US President made the blunder.

The 79-year-old also accidentally referred to the Iraq War as a key reason behind global financial woes, before correcting himself to cite the war in Ukraine.

Joe Biden made a similar gaffe in October.
Joe Biden made a similar gaffe in October.

He said: “They talk about inflation… inflation is a worldwide problem right now because of a war in Iraq and the impact on oil and what Russia’s doing… excuse me, the war in Ukraine."

President Biden then clarified where his confusion stemmed from, saying he thought about Iraq because "that's where my son died".

Beau Biden died at the age of 46 in 2015 after battling brain cancer in the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.

He had returned to the US after serving in Iraq, first being deployed there in September 2009 where he spent a year working as a military lawyer in the Delaware National Guard brigade.

President Biden appeared to reference Beau's death while discussing the price of prescription drugs.

The 79-year-old spoke about the drugs Beau was exposed to in toxic burn pits during his deployment in Iraq, something which Biden believes may have been a factor in his cancer.

He said: “My son, who died of stage 4 glioblastoma, the cost of those drugs was enormous."

In an emotional 2019 speech, he said: “In my view, I can’t prove it yet, he came back with stage 4 glioblastoma. Eighteen months he lived, knowing he was going to die."

The US President made a similar gaffe in October when he made reference to his son Beau dying in Iran during a Colorado speech on October 13, telling the crowd his son "lost his life in Iraq".

President Biden said: “American soldiers of the 10th Mountain Division scaled that 1,800-foot cliff at night, caught the Germans by surprise, captured key positions, and broke through the German defense line at a pivotal point in the war.”