Joe Biden causes fury with St Patrick's Day joke: 'Imagine if Trump had said this'

The latest gaffe from the US President has caused fury, particularly in Ireland

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US President Joe Biden has managed to insult the nation of Ireland on St Patrick's Day.

Biden, 79, has made a number of embarrassing errors in recent speeches, and this one was no different.

During a virtual St Patrick’s Day meeting with Taoiseach Micheal Martin, Biden proudly spoke of his Irish heritage.

He said: "Well, I just want you to know, I may be Irish but I'm not stupid. I married Dominic Giacoppo's daughter," he referencing the name of Jill Biden's dad, Donald Jacobs.

Irish residents reacted with Fury to Biden's apparent joke.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaking during a session on 'Accelerating clean technology innovation and deployment' with world leaders and individuals from the private sector during the Cop26 summit at the Scottish Event Campus (SEC) in Glasgow. Picture date: Tuesday November 2, 2021.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaking during a session on 'Accelerating clean technology innovation and deployment' with world leaders and individuals from the private sector during the Cop26 summit at the Scottish Event Campus (SEC) in Glasgow. Picture date: Tuesday November 2, 2021.

One wrote: "There goes the Irish vote. Imagine the reaction if Trump had called the Irish stupid? The guy’s an embarrassment."

Another added: "Biden just implied all Irish are stupid."

While one said: "So according to Joe Biden today the Irish are stupid then Nancy Pelosi reads out a poem written by Bono saying Zelensky is now St Patrick

"I don't think we Irish are that impressed tbh,thanks for insulting us today of all days."

Mr Biden also reaffirmed the US administration’s “unequivocal support” for the Good Friday Agreement.

Mr Biden, who identifies deeply with his own Irish heritage, was seated beside a traditional bowl of shamrock during the bilateral meeting.

He quoted Irish poet WB Yeats as he described the impact the Russian invasion of Ukraine has had on the world.

U.S. President Joe Biden announces new steps requiring government to buy more made-in-America goods during remarks in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building's South Court Auditorium at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 4, 2022. REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein
U.S. President Joe Biden announces new steps requiring government to buy more made-in-America goods during remarks in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building's South Court Auditorium at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 4, 2022. REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein

“All changed, changed utterly – a terrible beauty has been born,” he said.

Mr Biden said Irish leadership on the issue has been “noticeable and impressive”.

Both leaders condemned the invasion, with the Irish leader speaking about the need for a “unity of purpose”.

The leaders’ bilateral meeting lasted just over an hour.

The pair discussed the economy, Brexit and the Good Friday Agreement, the ongoing war in Ukraine and the undocumented Irish in the US.

Mr Martin reiterated the invitation for the President to come to Ireland, with Mr Biden saying he would love to visit Ireland again.

Mr Biden praised Ireland’s willingness to take in refugees, adding: “What Ireland is doing now, what you are doing, taking in Ukrainian refugees, speak so loudly about your principles.

“And it’s amazing and I want to publicly compliment you for it.

“I think you’ve already brought in over 7,000 or so refugees from Ukraine, and you’re prepared to do more, so thank you.”

The Irish premier, who appeared virtually from Blair House where he is currently staying, also thanked Mr Biden for the US’ backing of the Good Friday Agreement.

He praised the “steadfast support”, referencing how “important the Good Friday Agreement is in respect of stability and peace on the island of Ireland”.

He said: “Over the last number of days, as I’ve been here, we’ve also witnessed – once again – that two way, very robust economic relationship between the United States and Ireland.”

Mr Martin, appearing virtually for the second year in a row due to a positive Covid-19 test, said it was unfortunate he and Mr Biden could not meet face to face.

“This year, we’re meeting virtually across the road, so we’re getting closer,” he joked.

Mr Biden is profoundly proud of his Irish ancestry and has never been shy about his passion for the country, its history and its literature.

References to Irish poets pepper many of his speeches, with Mr Biden choosing to namecheck the late Eavan Boland during a speech at the Ireland Funds Gala dinner in Washington on Wednesday evening.