JK Rowling says 'naive' Nicola Sturgeon will be held responsible for sex attacks resulting from new gender law reforms

The writer of Harry Potter claimed Sturgeon is 'naive' to think the Bill wouldn't be used by predatory men to gain access to vulnerable women

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Author JK Rowling has issued a fresh attack on Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, saying she would be held responsible for the rape and assault of women for allowing people to self-identify under the Gender Recognition Reform Bill.

The writer of Harry Potter claimed Sturgeon is "naive" to think the Bill wouldn't be used by predatory men to gain access to vulnerable women.

JK Rowling is a vocal critic of the Scottish First Minister.
JK Rowling is a vocal critic of the Scottish First Minister.

Writing for the Sunday Times, Rowling said Sturgeon would be held responsible for "voyeurism, sexual harassment, assault or rape" that she believes may arise from the Bill.

The attack comes amid a rift between the Scottish resident and First Minister Sturgeon, which was triggered when Rowling shared an image of herself in a T-shirt that called Nicola Sturgeon "a destroyer of women's rights".

The author said: “Sturgeon loftily dismisses anyone who fears her new legislation could be wide open to abuse.

“Nobody but the very naive can fail to be aware that predatory men are capable of going to great lengths to gain easy access to victims, and have often sought out professions or special status that offer camouflage for their activities.”

Legislation is being pushed through by the Scottish Government that will allow Scots to change their legal sex in a much easier manner.

Sturgeon is hoping to introduce a "self-identification" system in place of the current process, which requires trans people to show a medical diagnosis of gender dysphoria, and to live in their "acquired gender" for two years in order for them to change their birth certificate.

Nicola Sturgeon has defended the plans, insisting she is a "passionate, life-long feminist".

Those supporting the proposed reforms say the claims will make no difference to the ability of male-bodied individuals to access women's spaces.