Jennie Bond questions why driver of second car in Princess Diana investigation has never been found

Jennie Bond told GB News that Diana will 'forever be a victim of the accident'

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A new documentary has explored the French police investigations that followed the death of Diana, Princess of Wales.

Diana was 36 when she was killed in a car crash in Paris on August 31, 1997 and her death has continued to attract conspiracy theories over the decades.

Speaking about the documentary’s findings, royal commentator Jennie Bond told GB News: “You do learn new things and it does shine new light, particularly on the driver of the car in which Diana died, Henri Paul.

“At the crash scene itself, we see the forensic detail of what was found there, some pearls were found, I didn’t know that.

Jennie Bond
Jennie Bond
Princess Diana
Princess Diana

“Some pieces of the tail light of another car that was in the tunnel, we’ve always heard there was another car in the tunnel.

“I must admit I didn’t know they had so much detail about the white Fiat Uno that was also there it would seem that suffered some damage.

“And that a woman, a witness, who was interviewed, saw the driver of the car gave a detailed description of him and the dog that was in the back which who was wearing a muzzle.

“And of course you do ask why could they not track down that driver and that car, but they must’ve had a reason whoever they were to get away from the scene and hide for all these years.”

Ms Bond added: “She died young and in the eyes of so many people, she will be forever young and she will forever be a victim, not only of her marriage or the Royal family, but of this accident.”

The first episode of Investigating Diana: Death In Paris followed the 1997 French Brigade Criminelle inquiry.

Eric Gigou, of the Brigade Criminelle, said: “We reconstructed the route they took, tried to discover all the witnesses, anyone who could have seen or heard anything near or far, people who might have crossed paths with the car, seen motorcycles, seen something in the minutes or seconds before the crash, perhaps at the moment of the impact or after the impact.

“For us it is a race against time from the moment we were given the case, because human memory is volatile and over time memories fade.”

The episode, which aired on Channel 4, explores the role of driver Mr Paul, who was deputy head of security at the Ritz, in the fatal accident.

It showed the front pages of many newspapers at the time claiming Mr Paul was three or four times over the drink-drive limit.