Insulate Britain vows to continue its campaign of direct action on 25th of October

Police officers detain protesters from Insulate Britain occupying a roundabout leading from the M25 motorway to Heathrow Airport in London. Picture date: Monday September 27, 2021.
Police officers detain protesters from Insulate Britain occupying a roundabout leading from the M25 motorway to Heathrow Airport in London. Picture date: Monday September 27, 2021.

The climate activists reject the Prime Minister’s Heat and Buildings Strategy

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Insulate Britain has said in a press release that they will continue their campaign of protesting, having found the Government’s Heat and Buildings Strategy, the Net Zero Strategy and the Cost of Net Zero report "completely fail to meet the challenges we now face".

The climate group called for "a wartime style national effort, a united front of shared sacrifice, not a plan to cross your fingers and hope for the best."

"Therefore Insulate Britain will continue our campaign of nonviolent civil resistance", they added.

In the press release the protestors urged "insulating Britain’s leaky homes should be central to the government’s Net Zero plans as the best first step to cut emissions and defend our country."

The climate change protestors said: "our ancestors fought a civil war to remove such tyranny from these islands and sacrificed their lives to win the rights and freedoms we now enjoy as citizens. Today it is our turn, our responsibility, to rise up against tyranny."

Insulate Britain said "the government’s plan to decarbonise our homes fails on almost every measure. The £450m allocated to grants for heat pumps will help just 30,000 households a year. This is a drop in the ocean compared with the 900,000 a year needed by 2028 according to the government’s own climate advisors (the Climate Change Committee)."

"The government’s £1.75bn funding for insulating social housing and the homes of those on low income will achieve only around 4% of what the Climate Change Committee recommends we should achieve by 2035", commented Insulate Britain.

The climate activists claimed that "the government has ignored industry calls for a fully funded national insulation scheme, despite its economic benefits, and has provided no incentives for homeowners to upgrade the insulation of their properties."