I'm a Celebrity contestant WITHDRAWS from show after just one day as Brits await Matt Hancock's arrival

Olivia Attwood has become the first contestant to leave the show after withdrawing on medical grounds

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Olivia Attwood has withdrawn from I’m A Celebrity… Get Me Out Of Here! on medical grounds, after just one day in the jungle.

ITV said the former Love Island contestant, 31, had been told by the programme’s medical team that it was not safe for her to return to camp.

Attwood becomes the first contestant to leave the show, which launched on Sunday night.

A spokesman for ITV said: “As a precautionary measure Olivia needed to leave the jungle to undergo some medical checks.

Olivia Attwood
Olivia Attwood
Matt Hancock
Matt Hancock

“Unfortunately the medical team has advised it is not safe for Olivia to return to camp as there needs to be a further investigation.

“She has been absolutely brilliant and she’ll be very much missed on the show.”

During the launch episode, Attwood was selected by the public to become a Jungle VIP, a Very Isolated Person, alongside radio DJ Chris Moyles, TV presenter and property expert Scarlette Douglas and Culture Club star Boy George.

This meant they spent their first night marooned on an island and also faced the first trial of the series.

While Brits still eagerly await the arrival of Matt Hancock into the jungle, with the former health secretary expected to enter in the coming days.

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak has said he is “very disappointed” in his former Cabinet colleague for joining the TV show.

Speaking on his way to Cop27 in Egypt, Mr Sunak said he supported the chief whip’s decision to suspend Mr Hancock from the Conservative Party, adding that he would not have time to watch the ITV show.

Mr Hancock, who represents West Suffolk, said he decided to enter the jungle to “go where the people are” rather than “sit in ivory towers in Westminster”.

But the Prime Minister took the opposite view on Sunday, telling The Sun he was “very disappointed” in the former health secretary because “MPs should be working hard for their constituents”.

Mr Sunak said: “I think politics is a noble profession, at its best – it can and should be – but it’s incumbent on politicians to earn people’s respect and trust.

“They do that by working hard for their constituents, as the vast majority of MPs do – that is why I was very disappointed with Matt’s decision.”

When asked whether he would be watching the programme, Mr Sunak told the newspaper: “I genuinely won’t have the time is the honest answer.”