Humongous potential world record-breaking toad dubbed 'Toadzilla' captured after terrorising wildlife

The animal dubbed 'Toadzilla' could beat a world record for its huge size
The animal dubbed 'Toadzilla' could beat a world record for its huge size

Wildlife officers thought the toad was fake due to its sheer size

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A “monster” toad found in a north Australian rainforest could break a world record with its size six times bigger than the average toad and weight of 2.7kg.

The animal, dubbed “Toadzilla” was removed from the wild and placed into a container.

Toads were first introduced to Australia in 1935 and are one of the country’s most damaging pests.

The park ranger said she has never seen a toad so big
The park ranger said she has never seen a toad so big

Park ranger Kylee Gray said she couldn’t believe her eyes when she saw the toad in Queensland.

"I've never seen anything so big," she told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

"[It looked] almost like a football with legs. We dubbed it Toadzilla."

The team, who believe Toadzilla is a female, returned to base to weigh her.

Currently, the Guinness World Record for the largest toad – 2.65kg – was set by a pet toad named Prinsen in Sweden in 1991.

Gray says this giant specimen likely bulked out on a diet of insects, reptiles and small mammals.

She said: "A cane toad that size will eat anything it can fit into its mouth.”

The toad could be donated to the Queensland Museum
The toad could be donated to the Queensland Museum

It is unknown how old Toadzilla is, but the species can live up to 15 years in the wild.

Toads have no natural predators in Australia and the poisonous species have wreaked havoc on native animal populations.

Due to standard practice in Australia for pests, Toadzilla has been euthanised and will likely be donated to Queensland Museum.