Government says doctors could spy on our URINE in bid to ease NHS pressure - 'Taking the p**s!'

Urinals could be the face of a new public health front.
Urinals could be the face of a new public health front.

The Health Secretary says new technology used in urinals could help spot diseases early

Published

Government’s may spy on our wee with microchips in toilets in order to reduce NHS pressure.

The Health Secretary says new technology used in urinals could help spot diseases early.

Steve Barclay also spoke about the parallels to sharing information on Facebook or Instagram.

He told the Spectator Health conference: “People trust a company in California with data more than they trust the UK government.

“Put a chip in a urinal and it will tell someone who doesn’t even realise they have a condition.”

In a speech heard by The Sun, he spoke about having a national “conversation with patients” about the “right opportunities” data poses.

High tech data collection methods such as toilet chips could help boost Britain’s economy and reduce the NHS’ strain, Mr Barclay added.

However, he said it must be done with consent obtained.

“I think if patients want to be able to get early treatment and are therefore willing to lean on their data, providing that can be done in the right way with the right safeguards that is the conversation we should be having," he said.

“That in turn also creates an opportunity for UK plc around our life sciences and around our future exports because it will build an ecosystem around our universities.”

The Sun reports that Labour have trashed the idea, with the Shadow Health Secretary saying Mr Barclay is “taking the p**s”.

Wes Streeting remarked: “After 12 years of Conservative mismanagement, NHS waiting times are already down the toilet.

“Instead he should adopt Labour’s plan, abolish non-doms, and train thousands of new doctors of new doctors and nurses.”