Google Maps goes WOKE by bringing in eco-friendly driving routes - 'You're wasting my time!'

Google Maps will use fuel or energy efficiency as well as looking at traffic and road conditions to find the best route for the driver.
Google Maps will use fuel or energy efficiency as well as looking at traffic and road conditions to find the best route for the driver.

Google Maps will use fuel or energy efficiency as well as looking at traffic and road conditions to find the best route for the driver.

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Google have been criticised for the roll out of their latest update to Maps, with users complaining of driving times increasing by 45 minutes.

The “eco-friendly routes” work by showing “fuel or energy-efficiency estimates on some routes based on your vehicle’s engine type. The more fuel or energy-efficient the route, the lower your car’s fuel/energy usage and CO2 emissions” according to Google.

When the features is turned on, Google Maps will use fuel or energy efficiency as well as looking at traffic and road conditions to find the best route for the driver.

Google Maps say the most fuel-efficient routes are ones with less hills, less traffic and more constant speeds for the duration of the journey.
Google Maps say the most fuel-efficient routes are ones with less hills, less traffic and more constant speeds for the duration of the journey.

According to Google, the most fuel-efficient routes are ones with less hills, less traffic and more constant speeds for the duration of the journey.

Drivers can still opt to travel via the fastest route, but will also be shown the fuel efficient route when entering their destination.

Google said: “Eco-friendly routing is making an impact around the world.

“Since launching in the U.S. and Canada, it’s already estimated to have helped remove more than half a million metric tons of carbon emissions — equivalent to taking 100,000 fuel-based cars off the road. We also recently rolled out the feature in Germany.”

Alongside the features, the company has also spent time updating the cycling routes on the app to encourage people to ditch four wheels for two.

Twitter user Luke Rudkowski shared his outrage at the new feature, saying: "Google maps is now automatically without your consent choosing the most fuel efficient route for you instead of the fastest route which wastes more of your time, FYI. You have to manually opt out of it."

Twitter user William Wolfe added: "Dear Google maps: I will never want to add 45 minutes to my trip for the sake of being more fuel efficient."

Google Maps users can still opt to travel via the fastest route, but will also be shown the fuel efficient route when entering their destination.
Google Maps users can still opt to travel via the fastest route, but will also be shown the fuel efficient route when entering their destination.

Last week scientists warned that Global carbon emissions in 2022 remain at record highs, with no sign of the falls needed to curb dangerous climate change.

If the world continues with current levels of emissions, there is a 50% chance that global temperature rises will hit 1.5C – a threshold beyond which the worst impacts of climate change are expected – in nine years, they said.

Emissions would have to fall at rates comparable to 2020 – when Covid-19 restrictions shut down transport, industry and economic activities – every year to keep temperature rises to 1.5C in the long term, the experts say.

But carbon pollution from burning fossil fuels has risen 1% on 2021 levels, the analysis from the Global Carbon Project says, and is now slightly above the record levels seen in 2019.

The increase in carbon dioxide from fossil fuels, including cement production, is due to the ongoing recovery from the pandemic and the energy crisis caused by the invasion of Ukraine, the researchers said.

Total carbon emissions for 2022, which also includes deforestation and other land use changes, are set to be around 40.6 billion tonnes, up slightly from 2021 and close to the record 40.9 billion tonnes emitted pre-pandemic in 2019.