Germany may have no option but to shut down a lot of its economy, gas expert tells Nigel Farage

Clive Moffatt believes Germany “can’t do anything but hope” they can continue their gas deal with Russia

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Germany may be forced to shut down much of its economy if they are unable to continue to import Russian gas.

Clive Moffatt, a gas consultant and advisor to the Government on energy security, believes Germany “can’t do anything but hope” they can continue their deal with Russia.

When asked about the agreement between the two countries, Mr Moffatt told Nigel Farage on GB News: “There is many years of engagement. Nord Stream 2 was an agreement between two nation states and it’s been built it just hasn’t been switched on.

“Germany is 50 percent dependant, has very little LNG (Liquefied natural gas) capacity for imports, it still burns coal if it has to.

Clive Moffatt
Clive Moffatt
Ms Moffatt in conversation with Nigel Farage
Ms Moffatt in conversation with Nigel Farage

“But the problem is, it is very defendant, its whole economy is very dependant (on Russia)."

Picking up a question from Nigel about what Germany could do to ensure their partnership continues, Mr Woffatt added: “They can’t do anything expect hope that there is some kind of agreement that it can continue to import Russian gas.

“And if that doesn’t happen, and if we have prolonged crisis in Europe, then Germany has no option but to shut down quite a lot of Its economy, accept much lower growth and make a major investment in LNG.

“What that will do is the whole scramble for LNG in Europe will exacerbate.”

His comments come after Conservative Party chairman Oliver Dowden said Germany could be doing more to help Ukraine defend itself.

Mr Dowden said the West needs to “continue to tighten the ratchet on Russia” as he said Moscow is now focusing on the east of Ukraine with a “determination to keep on going and going”.

He added: “What I think we are seeing is both changing Russia tactics, so Russia concentrating on the east of Ukraine, and a Russian determination to keep on going and going.

“That’s why I think it is really important that we need to continue to tighten the ratchet on Russia, whether that’s, for example, the 120 armoured personnel carriers that the Prime Minister agreed with Zelenskyy just last week or whether it is continuing to increase aid and tighten our sanctions.

“So, the West has to respond in turn and we are willing to do so.”