Families urged to talk to teenagers about knife crime in wake of Gordon Gault's death: 'You could save a life'

14-year-old Gordon Gault died six days after being knifed
14-year-old Gordon Gault died six days after being knifed

A senior police officer says families need to speak to teenagers more about knife crime after Gordon Gault's death

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Families need to talk to teenagers about knife crime, a senior police officer said after a boy was stabbed.

Gordon Gault, 14, died in hospital six days after being knifed during an “altercation” involving a group of people in a Newcastle street, Northumbria Police said.

Some 14 people have been arrested since the fracas on Wednesday November 9, the force said.

Those involved are thought to have known each other.

Speaking outside Etal Lane police station, Chief Superintendent Helena Barron, area commander for Newcastle and Gateshead, said: “It is with sadness that I am standing here today following the loss of a young life in a suspected knife attack.

“As a result of an incident in the Elswick area of Newcastle last Wednesday, 14-year-old Gordon Gault, of Newcastle, has tragically died.

“This is a devastating outcome and our thoughts are with his family at this time.”

Helena Barron said the death of Gordon Gault is a 'tragic outcome'.
Helena Barron said the death of Gordon Gault is a 'tragic outcome'.

Last month, Tomasz Oleszak, also 14, died in a stabbing in Gateshead, with a boy the same age charged with murder.

Ms Barron said: “We are working with partners to tackle knife crime. It’s really tragic we have had this twice within the last few weeks.”

She said forces around the country are working hard to tackle the issue and said everyone has a role to play.

“Each and every one of us – as parents, families, communities and as a society – can help tackle knife crime,” she said.

“This is a priority for us and a huge amount of work is ongoing every single day to reduce the impact of this type of offending – from knife searches, targeting suspects and delivering educational inputs in schools and universities.

“I am asking for you to continue to work with us.

“As families, please have those conversations about the consequences of knife crime.

“To those who carry a knife or weapon: think again and do not take them out with you.

“To anyone who has information about someone who is in possession of a knife or any weapon: please let us know.

“By taking action now, you could save a life.”

Those with information are asked to contact Northumbria Police’s Tell Us Something page on its website or by calling 101.