Extinction Rebellion 'succeeding where Arthur Scargill failed in bringing Britain to its knees'

Eco protesters are able to cause more chaos and economic mayhem than tens of thousands of striking miners, Richard Littlejohn says

Published

Extinction Rebellion protesters are “succeeding where Arthur Scargill failed in bringing Britain to its knees” broadcaster Richard Littlejohn say amid the widespread disruption caused by climate campaigners.

Arthur Scargill was a figurehead of the miners' strikes that hit Britain in the 1980s.

The former leader of the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) is best-known for his defence of British coal mines in an era of decline and closure which brought him into conflict with Margaret Thatcher’s government.

Mr Littlejohn compared the NUM's campaign tactics to those of climate change group Extinction Rebellion.

He said: “These days revolutionary socialists have all hitched their wagons to the burgeoning green tyranny. Curiously, the same kind of hard-Left headcases, who back then were desperate to keep the coal mines open, now want to ban fossil fuels altogether.

Arthur Scargill on a demonstration rally against pit closures outside University of Sunderland's Edinburgh Building
Arthur Scargill on a demonstration rally against pit closures outside University of Sunderland's Edinburgh Building
Activists from Extinction Rebellion dressed as cleaners speak to a police liaison officer outside Lloyds of London, in the City of London
Activists from Extinction Rebellion dressed as cleaners speak to a police liaison officer outside Lloyds of London, in the City of London

“Their tactics may differ from the NUM, but their aims are the same — to cause as much misery and disruption as possible in pursuit of their political ends.”

The comments come as Extinction Rebellion stage mass protests across the country to demand the Government stops new oil and gas projects.

In the past two weeks, hundreds of demonstrators have been arrested as they have blocked oil terminals, abseiled off London bridges and staged sit-ins on major traffic arteries.

On Tuesday, climate protesters "glued, locked and chained" themselves to the Lloyd's of London offices and the following did the same at Shell's, a multinational oil and gas company's, headquarters.

A demonstrator is carried away by police outside the Department for Business in London
A demonstrator is carried away by police outside the Department for Business in London
Activists from Extinction Rebellion stand on a stairwell at Lloyds of London
Activists from Extinction Rebellion stand on a stairwell at Lloyds of London

Last week, they abseiled down Tower Bridge causing its closure for several hours.

Today, protesters launched fresh raids on the UK’s oil terminals in at the Kingsbury terminal in Birmingham, as well as the Navigator Oil terminal in Thurrock and Grays oil terminal, both in Essex.

Petrol and diesel shortages are now “an issue” and some filling stations are “drying up”, according to a fuel price pressure group.

Howard Cox, founder of FairFuelUK, said a third of its supporters who responded to a survey last weekend said they have encountered a “problem” finding fuel.

Mr Cox said: “Some garages are now really drying up."

Activists from Extinction Rebellion demonstrate in central London
Activists from Extinction Rebellion demonstrate in central London

Extinction Rebellion protester Todd Smith told GB News: “We’re just demanding the government stops all new fossil fuel investments, is w what the United nations and independent energy agency have asked for.

“We’re not dangerous radicals as the UN secretary says.”

Presenter Inaya Folarin Iman responded: “You just want to stop life for ordinary people? The Government is implementing the policies you ask for, that's not good enough for you? It just seems like a fantasy land quite frankly."

Mr Littlejohn added in his comment piece for the Daily Mail: “Today, a handful of self-indulgent eco-mentalists are able to cause more chaos and economic mayhem than tens of thousands of striking miners, while the authorities stand back and let them get on with it.

"These days, Arthur Scargill wouldn't have to resort to pitched battles with the police.

"He'd only have to glue himself to the gates at Orgreave and the Old Bill would bring him a nice cup of tea."