Exclusive: Labour MP breaks rank and declares 'a man has a penis and a woman has vagina'

Shadow Justice Secretary Steve Reed said 'of course he knows what a woman is' on GB News

Published

A Labour MP appears to have broken ranks by telling GB News a "man has a penis and a woman has a vagina".

Various members of the Labour Party and even its leader Sir Keir Starmer have come unstuck when asked the tricky question of what is a woman.

Sir Keir refused to answer the question, stating "I don't think that discussing this issue in this way helps anyone in the long run".

And his deputy Angela Rayner deemed it "not acceptable" to ask a trans woman if they have a penis.

But MP for Croydon North and Shadow Justice Secretary Steve Reed gave a definitive answer on the subject when appearing on Breakfast with Eamonn and Isabel.

Steve Reed
Steve Reed

When asked by broadcaster Clare Muldoon to define what a woman is, Mr Reed was definitive in his assessment.

"Oh my goodness me, of course I know what a woman is. Why are you even asking that?

"A man has a penis and a woman has a vagina. If that's not clear enough for you then I'm afraid it's your issue and not my issue.

"The point here is that women are being abuse, targeted with sexism, that is putting them off going in to politics."

Mr Reed had appeared on the show to discuss the Mail on Sunday's "basic instinct" story on Angela Rayner.

Angela Rayner speaks at a protest by unions outside the Houses of Parliament, London, over P&O Ferries handing 800 seafarers immediate severance notices last week
Angela Rayner speaks at a protest by unions outside the Houses of Parliament, London, over P&O Ferries handing 800 seafarers immediate severance notices last week

The editor of The Mail on Sunday has refused to attend a meeting with Commons Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle over the paper’s controversial report about Angela Rayner.

Sir Lindsay told MPs on Monday he had arranged a meeting with David Dillon following an outcry over claims the Labour deputy leader crossed and uncrossed her legs during Prime Minister’s Questions to distract Boris Johnson.

In his response to the Speaker, published in the Daily Mail, Mr Dillon said he would not be attending as journalists should “not take instruction from officials of the House of Commons, however august they may be”.

In his letter, he wrote: “The Mail on Sunday deplores sexism and misogyny in all its forms. However journalists must be free to report what they are told by MPs about conversations which take place in the House of Commons, however unpalatable some may find them.”

He said that while The Mail on Sunday had “the greatest possible respect both for your office and for Parliament [which] along with a free press they are the foundation stones of British democracy”, the invitation would be declined.

Earlier, in a statement, Sir Lindsay said he wanted to use the meeting to ask that “we are all a little kinder”, issuing a plea to reporters to consider the feelings of MPs and their families when covering stories in Parliament.

He made the point that he had only recently rejected calls to remove the parliamentary pass from another journalist after some MPs called for The Mail on Sunday’s political editor Glen Owen – who wrote the report about Ms Rayner – to have his pass removed.