Exam bosses could record non-binary pupils results separately following Stonewall talks

Exam chiefs at the JCQ said the plans were intended to show “support for the non-binary community”

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Exam bosses are considering recording the results of pupils who identify themselves as non-binary in a separate category.

Currently, exam results across the UK are collated in boys and girls categories.

But JCQ, the body that represents exam boards, say they are contemplating bringing in a third category for non-binary students.

It comes following talks between JCQ and LGBT charity Stonewall, as well as discussions involving the exam company and stakeholders.

Non-binary students could have their exam results recorded separately
Non-binary students could have their exam results recorded separately
Maya Forstater
Maya Forstater

A JCQ spokesman said they were "pleased to share that we will be looking at this in the future".

The spokesman added to Mail Plus that the move was intended to show “support for the non-binary community”.

Some people have backed the proposals including Dr Jane Hamlin from the transgender support group, Beaumont Society.

Dr Jane told The Telegraph: “It’s going to show that transgender and non-binary people are recognised as real people and it's a good idea.”

But Sex Matters’ Maya Forstater has hit back at the plans, saying: “You are losing data, and the potential to see whether girls are doing better than boys or vice versa.

"This is important for the government and education authorities to know. If information on the sex of some students is not being collected because they declare themselves non-binary, it undermines the statistics."

"Throwing away the data even for just a small group means the overall data is not robust. Anything that you do that is trying to address inequality between boys and girls needs to be based on clear data.

"Schools, the government and the exam boards all have an interest in being able to ensure boys and girls can both access education and be assessed fairly.

“Non-binary has no legal status, so there is no reason to ask children if they are non-binary."