EU spends over £500,000 of taxpayers' money on drag queen shows and diversity projects

Countries such as Poland and Hungary are at odds with the EU over woke ideology

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The European Union has spent almost €1 million funding drag queen shows and other diversity projects that aim to "blur the lines" on traditional gender roles.

The schemes have been backed by a €892,050 fund from the taxpayer which aimed to tackle issues such as "toxic masculinity" and to create LGBT-friendly schools across the continent, The Telegraph reveals.

The EU's founding members and governments within the bloc, namely in eastern and central parts, have found woke ideology to be a sticking point.

The EU is at odds with some of it's member states over woke ideology.
The EU is at odds with some of it's member states over woke ideology.

Hungary and Poland have found themselves at loggerheads with the EU Commission and Western member states as a result of the cultural divide.

Officials in Budapest and Warsaw harbour fears over their EU funding potentially facing cuts as a result of their conservative stance on LGBT rights and abortion.

Almost €1 million has been spent on funding drag queen shows and other diversity projects.
Almost €1 million has been spent on funding drag queen shows and other diversity projects.

The investigation comes after it was claimed there is now a willingness in the British Government to have a “serious dialogue” about solving problems caused by the Northern Ireland Protocol, Irish Foreign Affairs minister Simon Coveney has said.

Speaking following a meeting with new Northern Ireland Secretary Chris Heaton-Harris at Hillsborough Castle, Co Down, Mr Coveney said the messages coming from London were “quite different” from those of recent months.

Mr Heaton-Harris said that he preferred a negotiated settlement with the EU over the post-Brexit arrangement, but added that the Government would continue with its legislation to override parts of the treaty.

The protocol, signed by former prime minister Boris Johnson’s government, effectively keeps Northern Ireland aligned with many EU single market rules to avoid a hard border with Ireland, therefore requiring some checks on goods crossing the Irish Sea.