Eastenders change their end credits for a one-off special to highlight the impact of climate change

King Charles and Queen Consort met the cast of Eastenders earlier this year
King Charles and Queen Consort met the cast of Eastenders earlier this year

The new credits are a promotion for Sir David Attenborough's nature documentary series Frozen Planet II

Published

BBC One’s Eastenders has changed their closing credits to reflect the challenges faced by frozen regions and how they could impact London.

The new credits are being used as promotion for the final episode if Sir David Attenborough’s nature documentary series, Frozen Planet II.

The one-off credits show a map of London’s East End and shows the River Thames, bursting its banks while other parts of the capital are under water, painting a picture of what London could look like if action isn’t taken against climate change.

The map zooms out to a satellite image of the Arctic, accompanied by a voice-over by David Attenborough saying ‘“This isn’t a reality now, but our future will be determined by what happens here.”

Frozen Planet II explores the effects of climate change on the worlds coldest regions
Frozen Planet II explores the effects of climate change on the worlds coldest regions

He continues ‘’The Arctic is now warming twice as fast as the Earth as a whole.’’

Highlighting the challenge of melting ice in the frozen region, Sir David said: “The Arctic is now warming twice as fast as the Earth as a whole.”

The first episode of Frozen Planet II aired on the 11th of September this year. The nature series explores wildlife in some of the coldest regions found in the world.

The final episode of Frozen Planet II explores the impact climate change is having on Earth’s frozen regions specifically. It will feature scientist and people who have dedicated their lives to documenting these changes as well as understanding the impact on the lives of the animals and people who live there, but also on the planet as a whole

The original series, Frozen Planet was released in 11 years ago and chronicled the ecosystems and animals of the Arctic and Antarctic . Episodes tracked the lives of polar bears, wolves, killer whales and penguins from the spring through the winter.

During his lengthy career in broadcasting, David Attenborough has devoted his time to spreading awareness about the negative impacts associated with climate change.

The broadcaster tends to utilise his nature documentaries to highlight the impact human activity has on the natural world. The last episode of The Living Planet focused entirely on human destruction of the environment and potential ways it could be saved or reversed.