Driving rules on clothing could land Brits with £5,000 fine

Rule 97 of the Highway Code says some items of clothing should not be worn if they "prevent you from using the controls in the correct manner"

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Drivers could be hit with a fine of up to £5,000 for wearing certain items of clothing at the wheel.

A section in Rule 97 of the Highway Code stipulates that some items of clothing could land you in trouble.

It states that items should not be worn if they “prevent you from using the controls in the correct manner”.

Such items include baggy jeans, long dresses, certain pairs of sunglasses and a wide array of footwear.

Drag row
Drivers wearing certain clothes could be fined up to £5,000
Drivers wearing certain clothes could be fined up to £5,000
Flip flops can "create a dangerous driving environment", according to one expert
Flip flops can "create a dangerous driving environment", according to one expert

While it’s not against the law to wear such items of clothing, it could be used as a determining factor if you were to be involved in a road traffic accident.

Drivers in an incident with footwear such as flip flops, sandals or high heels could face charges of “driving without due care and attention”.

The charge carries a £100 fine and three points on your licence.

That charge could rise to £5,000 if the case goes to court as well, while drivers could also face nine points on their license and even the potential of a driving ban.

The Driving Standards Agency said: "suitable shoes are particularly important behind the wheel. We would not recommend driving barefoot because you don’t have the same braking force with bare feet as you do with shoes on."

Selim Cavanagh, CEO of insurance company ingenie, told the Mirror: “(Flip flops) slip off, slide under the pedals, get caught between your feet and the pedals and if your feet are wet, they’ll affect your ability to brake if you need to.

"Driving in flip flops can create a dangerous driving environment, and put you, your passengers, and other road users at risk.”