Drivers wearing sunglasses could be handed £5,000 fine according to Highway Code rule

The rule suggests drivers should use their visor to block out the sun instead

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Drivers have been left fuming after finding out about a Highway Code violation that could land them a £5,000 fine.

Rule 94 of the code says: "At night or in poor visibility, do not use tinted glasses, lenses or visors if they restrict your vision."

It suggests that drivers should instead use their visor to try and block the sun out.

The AA states: "Vision must remain clear and sufficient light to let you see properly must get to your eyes.

"Sunglasses sold for general use can be too dark for driving in.

Rule 94 of the code says "At night or in poor visibility, do not use tinted glasses, lenses or visors if they restrict your vision."
Rule 94 of the code says "At night or in poor visibility, do not use tinted glasses, lenses or visors if they restrict your vision."
Changes to the Highway Code were made last week, allowing motorists in self-driving cars to watch TV.
Changes to the Highway Code were made last week, allowing motorists in self-driving cars to watch TV.

"Plus, fashion frames could obscure your peripheral vision if they aren't the right style, so it's best to choose your shades carefully."

Drivers wearing clothing that is not appropriate and restricts manoeuvring face fines of £100 or more and three penalty points.

If taken to court these fines can increase to £5,000, with nine penalty points and can even lead to a driving ban.

Their tips for avoiding a fine include:

  • Discussing options for sun and glare protection with an optician.
  • Considering a specialist driving lens or tint.
  • Being aware that everyday sunglasses might not be suitable for driving.

According to rule 237 of the Highway Code, drivers should stop driving if the sun is getting in their eyes.

It reads: "If you are dazzled by bright sunlight, slow down and if necessary, stop."

Changes to the Highway Code were made last week, allowing motorists in self-driving cars to watch TV.

Users of self-driving cars will also not be responsible for crashes under proposed changes.

Insurance companies rather than individuals will be liable for claims in those circumstances, the Department for Transport said (DfT).

It will still be illegal to use a phone behind the wheel.

The update to the Code will make it clear that motorists must be ready to take back control of vehicles when needed.

These measures – which follow a public consultation – were described as an interim measure by the Government to support the early deployment of self-driving vehicles.