Drivers warned about buying fuel at supermarkets: ’In for a nasty surprise’

The warning comes as both the price of diesel and petrol rose by around 10p and 4p per litre respectively

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Drivers have been warned they could be “in for a nasty surprise” when buying fuel at supermarkets.

It comes as the price of diesel rose by the third biggest monthly increase ever from 180.37p to 190.51p per litre, according to RAC Fuel Watch.

The price hike means that those with a 55-litre tank car will pay almost £105 to fill up.

It’s not just the price of diesel that has gone up... petrol has too.

Drivers have been warned they could be “in for a nasty surprise” when buying fuel at supermarkets
Drivers have been warned they could be “in for a nasty surprise” when buying fuel at supermarkets
The price of diesel rose by the third biggest monthly increase ever from 180.37p to 190.51p
The price of diesel rose by the third biggest monthly increase ever from 180.37p to 190.51p

The price of petrol has risen by 3.71p a litre from 162.67p to 166.38p, according to the RAC Fuel Watch, meaning the price of a full tank now costs more than £90.

The RAC’s Simon Williams: “After three months of falling pump prices October was a severe shock to the system for drivers with the unwelcome return of some scary numbers on forecourt totems.

“Those with diesel vehicles suffered most with 10p being added to the cost of a litre in what was the third worst monthly increase on record, but petrol car drivers also saw a 4p-a-litre increase across the country."

He added: “The fear now, particularly for diesel drivers, is whether the average price of a litre is heading back to that record of 199.09p which made a full tank cost more than £109.

“Looking at the wholesale market we strongly hope the price should stabilise.

“And those with petrol cars should actually see forecourt prices start to go slightly the other way as the wholesale cost of unleaded appears to have peaked – at least for the time being – in mid-October.”

While Mr Williams also urged motorists not to just assume that supermarket fuel prices will be the cheapest places to buy fuel.

He continued: “Those who assume their local supermarket will be the cheapest may be in for a nasty surprise as the ‘big four’ are currently only a penny cheaper for petrol than the UK average."