Disney heir comes out as trans and slams 'Don't Say Gay' bill

Roy P Disney, the great-nephew of Walt Disney and the co-founder of Walt Disney, revealed his son, Charlee, was trans, as he pledged $500,000 to the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) along with his family

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A Disney heir has publicly come out as transgender and criticised the company for not doing enough to speak out against Florida's 'Don't Say Gay' bill.

Roy P Disney, the great-nephew of Walt Disney and the co-founder of Walt Disney, revealed his son, Charlee, was trans, as he pledged $500,000 to the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) along with his family.

Mr Disney told Human Rights Campaign, America's largest LGBTQ+ advocacy group, in an appeal: "Equality matters deeply to us especially because our child, Charlee, is transgender and a proud member of the LGBTQ+ community".

Charlee Disney, a 30-year-old science teacher, came out as trans four years ago, according to the Los Angeles Times.

The comments mark the first time the family have addressed their gender orientation in public.

The 'Don't Say Gay' bill has stirred national controversy and got attention during Sunday's Oscars telecast amid an increasingly partisan debate over what schools should teach children about race and gender.

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed the bill in March, banning classroom instruction on sexual orientation and gender identity for many young students, drawing swift criticism from companies, Democrats and advocacy groups.

Formally called the "Parental Rights in Education" bill, the Florida measure bars classroom instruction on sexual orientation or gender identity for children in kindergarten through third grade, or from about ages 5-9, in public schools.

It also prohibits such teaching that "is not age appropriate or developmentally appropriate" for students in other grades.

Under the law, which takes effect on July 1, parents will be allowed to sue school districts they believe to be in violation.