Denmark suspends Covid vaccination programme as virus is 'under control'

The country will no longer invite members of the public to receive a vaccination from May 15

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The government in Denmark has announced that they will no longer be vaccinating people against Covid-19 after managing to get the virus under control.

The Danish Health Authority said they believe the country is now in a “good position”.

It makes the Danes the first country to pause their vaccination programme.

The country has seen a high level of vaccination uptake, less infections and a stabilised number of people being admitted to hospital.
The country has seen a high level of vaccination uptake, less infections and a stabilised number of people being admitted to hospital.
Former Health Minister Matt Hancock outside his home in north west London
Former Health Minister Matt Hancock outside his home in north west London

The country has seen a high level of vaccination uptake, less infections and a stabilised number of people being admitted to hospital.

Roughly 81 percent of the country have at least two doses of the Covid-19 vaccine, a further 62 percent have received their booster.

The country will no longer invite members of the public to receive a vaccination from May 15.

In the UK this week the High Court ruled Government policies on discharging untested hospital patients into care homes at the start of the coronavirus pandemic were “unlawful”, undermining claims that a “protective ring” was put in place for the most vulnerable.

When the pandemic hit in early 2020, patients were rapidly discharged into care homes without testing, despite the risk of asymptomatic transmission, with Government documents showing there was no requirement for this until mid-April.

Bereaved families and care groups said the ruling proves the “protective ring” then health secretary Matt Hancock said had been put around care homes was “non-existent”, a “sickening lie” and a “joke”.

A spokesman for Mr Hancock said Public Health England (PHE) had failed to tell ministers what they knew about asymptomatic transmission and he wished it had been brought to his attention sooner.

Boris Johnson said he wanted to “renew my apologies and sympathies”, adding: “The thing we didn’t know in particular was that Covid could be transmitted asymptomatically in the way that it was and that was something that I wish we had known more about at the time.”