Cyclists wear car frames on the streets of London to show ‘absurdity’ of vehicles hogging roads

Micromobility firm Dott is carrying out the stunt in Hammersmith, west London

Published

Cyclists wearing frames shaped like cars are taking to the streets of London to demonstrate that vehicles are “hogging” roads.

Micromobility firm Dott is carrying out the stunt in Hammersmith, west London, this week.

It estimated that reducing the number of cars used in the capital by 20,000 – equivalent to less than 1 percent – would free up 55 miles (88km) of roads and create enough space for 80,000 bikes.

Cyclists wearing frames shaped like cars have taken to the streets of London
Cyclists wearing frames shaped like cars have taken to the streets of London
Micromobility firm Dott is carrying out the stunt in Hammersmith, west London
Micromobility firm Dott is carrying out the stunt in Hammersmith, west London

Dott has been one of three operators involved in a trial of rental e-scooters in London since June 2021.

It began offering rental e-bikes in the city in March.

Dott co-founder and chief executive Henri Moissinac said: “Our latest project highlights the absurdity of single drivers hogging the capital’s roads, when other forms of transport are openly available and so much better for both the individual and the community.

“It’s time we reimagined how we travel across our cities, which is why we’re here to unlock London with clean rides for everyone.”

It comes as broadcaster and cycling safety activist Jeremy Vine shamed a Waitrose lorry driver by sharing footage of a ride he went on with two members of the Met Police's dedicated cycling team.

Mr Vine scrutinised the behaviour of the driver, after the officer was forced to move to the middle of the lane and raise his arm to alert the motorist of their presence.

In his voiceover, Mr Vine began by saying: "I want you to watch this police officer just in front of it [the lorry].

"Again, the word police is in large letters on his back. You see him flinch, he moves left a bit, raises his right hand as if to say, 'hang on, you just came too close.'

"Now, I'm starting to think this does look close for a whacking-weight truck like this".