Commonwealth Games 2022 'changing rules to allow trans women cyclists to compete for female medals'

The new gender rules were passed by Commonwealth Games' chiefs and are waiting approval from authorities

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Commonwealth Games are to allow trans women cyclists to compete for female medals, it has been reported.

Following the approval of new gender rules by authorities, it is thought the door will be open for a trans woman cyclist to compete this summer in Birmingham 2022.

She can compete on the same terms as she would be allowed by the Union Cycliste Internationale, the world governing body.

Talks over her inclusion have been carried out for over a year after rules around transgender policy have proved fiercely divisive.

A spokesman said the new policy "will be in keeping with principles established in the IOC framework on Fairness, Inclusion and Non-Discrimination on the Basis of Gender Identity and Sex Variations.

Female Cyclists compete in the Commonwealth Games
Female Cyclists compete in the Commonwealth Games
Pupils from schools in Birmingham carry the Commonwealth flag as well as member nations flags
Pupils from schools in Birmingham carry the Commonwealth flag as well as member nations flags

Their federation statement adds: "We embrace all Commonwealth athletes, citizens, communities and nations and promote fairness, non-discrimination and inclusion”.

In November, he International Olympic Committee (IOC) issued new guidelines for determining transgender and intersex athletes.

They ruled transgender women will no longer have to reduce their testosterone levels to compete in the category.

The IOC also reversed their view that trans women have an advantage over natal women, saying there should no longer be a presumption.

They ultimately ruled it was up to the individual sports to decide their rules dpending on what was needed to ensure fair and safe competition.

But others say transgender athletes pose a risk to the integrity of women’s sport.

Ross Tucker, a leading expert from the Science of Sport podcast, said its evidenced that competition cannot be fair if trans women athletes are allowed to be included simply on the basis of lowering testosterone.

The potential transgender medalist's national body declined to comment specifically on her case, saying it "does not comment on individual selection decisions, but we will consider any rider who meets the eligibility criteria which we use when making decisions on our nominations."