Climate change threatens European ski resorts as they shut due to RECORD BREAKING temperatures

Images surfacing online show snowless mountains and slushy grass as towns’ entire economies watch with bated breath.
Images surfacing online show snowless mountains and slushy grass as towns’ entire economies watch with bated breath.

A meteorologist has said the temperatures are 'truly unprecedented in modern records'

Published

European ski resorts have been forced to shut as record breaking temperatures threaten the safety of skiers.

Images surfacing online show snowless mountains and slushy grass as towns’ entire economies watch with bated breath.

Switzerland’s average temperature this weekend was around 18C, while France saw the warmest temperatures in a quarter of a century.

Other countries such as Germany and Poland saw temperatures that would be typically recorded in Spring, arriving in January.

Warsaw recorded temperatures of close to 19C.

The increasing temperatures have caused many French ski resorts to close up shop after being open a mere month.

Resorts on the northern Alps and French Pyrenees have struggled the most.

Laurent Reynaud of the Domaines Skiables de France told Sky News: “There was a good start to the season with a cold wave in mid-December, which provided some white to pretty much everyone.

“Then, last week, there was quite a bit of rain and warm temperatures, so a certain number of runs had to close again.”

A meteorologist has said the temperatures are 'truly unprecedented in modern records'
A meteorologist has said the temperatures are 'truly unprecedented in modern records'

Meteorologist Scott Duncan tweeted: “We just observed the warmest January day on record for many countries in Europe. Truly unprecedented in modern records.”

Meanwhile in the UK, the Met Office has issued a yellow warning of rain for southern Scotland and parts of central Scotland, the Highlands, and Argyll and Bute which is valid from 2pm on Tuesday until 6am on Wednesday.

It states that occasionally heavy rain, and a thaw of snow lying on the hills, is expected to lead to localised flooding and transport disruption.

Later on Tuesday a yellow alert comes into force in southern and north-west Wales, with a warning of heavy rain between 7pm and 3am on Wednesday.