Civil servants should have heating paid for by Government so they can work from home, union bosses say

Union bosses have said that the Government should pay for civil servants’ heating so they can continue to work from home.
Union bosses have said that the Government should pay for civil servants’ heating so they can continue to work from home.

It also noted that the current push to get employees back into the office is 'incredibly damaging'

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Union bosses have said that the Government should pay for civil servants’ heating so they can continue to work from home.

A study by the FDA Union, which represents over 22,000 senior officials, looked into views on working from home as well as hybrid working between office and home.

The findings revealed a workforce that felt “patronised” due to threats of “school registers” to record the attendance of employees as well as “vague and implicit threats”.

The study put forward four ways in which employees could be helped.
The study put forward four ways in which employees could be helped.

It also noted that the current push to get employees back into the office is “incredibly damaging, and this attitude cannot be allowed to continue, otherwise talented individuals will leave the civil service.”

The study put forward four ways in which employees could be helped, one suggests “departments and government give all employees who work remotely or in a hybrid model an allowance to help towards increased energy and utility costs, as well as the necessary equipment for remote working to be safe and effective”.

Concerns were raised that working from home full time would cause social isolation.

It suggested a hybrid between home and office working was the best way forward.

Jacob Rees-Mogg left notes at the desks of civil servants after telling them to get back into the office.
Jacob Rees-Mogg left notes at the desks of civil servants after telling them to get back into the office.

In April, Jacob Rees-Mogg faced criticism for leaving notes at the desks of civil servants after telling them to get back into the office.

An image circulating online of the note allegedly left by the Minister for Brexit Opportunities and Government Efficiency read: “Sorry you were out when I visited.

“I look forward to seeing you in the office very soon.

“With every good wish, Rt Hon. Jacob Rees-Mogg M.P.”

The move was branded “vindictive” by Dave Penman, the general secretary of the FDA representing senior civil servants, who said ministers were out of step with practice in the private sector.