Carrie Johnson is ensuring Boris remains committed to 'ludicrous' Net Zero claims Christine Hamilton

The Prime Minister has defended imposing green levies on energy bills despite the cost-of-living crisis

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Boris Johnson’s carbon-cutting ambitions are inspired by wife, Carrie Johnson, Christine Hamilton has claimed.

It comes as the Prime Minister has defended imposing green levies on energy bills despite the cost-of-living crisis, claiming there is “a lot of prejudice” against the sustainable agenda.

Speaking on GB News, she said: “I'll tell you one reason why I think Boris is so committed to it [Net-Zero] and that’s of course Mrs. Johnson.'

She continued: “Carrie is absolutely committed to all that, but of course it’s ludicrous.

“We should be mining more fossil fuels, we should be getting the stuff out the North Sea and we should be fracking.

“We should be taking the pressure of the poor suffering householder.

“It is of course the people at the bottom of the economic heap wo are going to bear the burden.

Author Christine Hamilton speaking on GB News
Author Christine Hamilton speaking on GB News

“People at the top of the heap, people like Boris can easily afford the extra few thousand.”

Clare Pearsall, former conservative advisor, interjected : “I think Net-zero is a laudable aim, but what I disagree with is punting this cost onto the public because that’s what essentially is happening.”

She added: “You can’t have this kind of plan without having the infrastructure in place. I live in a village where there aren’t many electric charging points, public transport is next to non-existent… so, what do people expect? You are going to have to drive to get anywhere.

“Until those things are sorted I don’t think you can commit to this and you can’t ask people to pay for something that you aren’t going to see the benefits of for the next thirty years.”

Prime Minister Boris Johnson with his wife Carrie
Prime Minister Boris Johnson with his wife Carrie

Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng previously failed to dismiss reports that the Government is considering scrapping green levies, which are used to fund renewable energy schemes, amid Tory backbench pressure.

When asked if he was “uncomfortable” imposing the charges in the middle of a cost-of-living crisis, Boris Johnson insisted that “green technology, green sustainable electricity can help to reduce bills”.

Speaking on Wednesday during a flight to India for a two-day visit, Mr Johnson said he wants to do everything possible to “alleviate the cost of living”, but it is “very important to understand” that there is “a lot of prejudice against the green agenda”.

He said: “Actually green technology, green, sustainable electricity can help to reduce bills.

“Overall, if you look at what we have done with renewables, it has helped to reduce bills over the last few years and will continue to do so.

“That’s why one of the things I want to do is use this moment to have, to really drive towards more offshore wind turbines.

“This country used to be number one for offshore wind… then China overtook us. We need to regain our lead, We need to build them faster and we can do it.”

The PM also repeatedly resisted ruling out extra measures to support families with soaring living costs before the autumn, when the energy price cap is expected to rise again.

Asked if the country can wait until that point to help families with the cost of living, Mr Johnson said: “We will do everything we can to help people through the aftershocks of Covid, as we have during the pandemic.”

Pressed on whether that meant he was not ruling out earlier measures, he said: “We’re going to do everything we can to help but don’t forget what we’ve already done: so there’s the council tax abatement of £150 for everybody in bands A to D homes.

“We’ve cut taxes for most people by lifting the NICs (national insurance contributions) threshold. That’s actually quite a big tax cut for loads of people.

“We’re continuing with all the supports that we offer – we’ve cut fuel duty by the biggest amount ever, 5p cut in fuel duty – altogether, the package is worth £22billion.

“But the best answer is to have high-wage, high-skilled jobs, which is why we’re off to India, to get more investment into this country.”

Asked again if he was therefore not ruling out further measures before the autumn, Mr Johnson said: “I’m saying we’ll do everything we can to help, but I’m pointing to what we’ve already done.”