Broken power line to Chernobyl nuclear plant restored, says Ukraine

The power is used to run pumps which keep spent nuclear fuel cool to prevent radiation leaks

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Ukraine says it has restored a broken power line to the Chernobyl plant, the scene of a nuclear meltdown in 1986, which is held by Russian troops.

Energy minister Herman Halushchenko said that “heroes” from the national power grid company had managed to restore the connection.

The power is used to run pumps which keep spent nuclear fuel cool to prevent radiation leaks.

Ukraine said on Wednesday that power had been cut to the site and that there was enough diesel fuel to run on-site generators for 48 hours.

The International Atomic Energy Agency played down concerns, saying it saw little risk of the pools containing the spent fuel overheating even without electricity.

Belarus said on Thursday that it had set up an emergency power line to Chernobyl from its nearby border.

The Chernobyl disaster was a nuclear accident that occurred on 26 April 1986 near the city of Pripyat in the north of the Ukrainian SSR in the Soviet Union.

It is considered the worst nuclear disaster in history both in cost and casualties.[3] It is one of only two nuclear energy accidents rated at seven—the maximum severity—on the International Nuclear Event Scale.