Brits could land £1,000 fines for not keeping their cars cool this summer

The Highway Code has a set of rules in place to safeguard motorists as temperatures rise, under Rule 237

Published

Hot weather driving habits could result in Brits receiving hefty fines during the summer period.

The Highway Code has a set of rules in place in order to safeguard motorists as temperatures rise, under Rule 237.

Not complying with the guidelines could see people behind the wheel landing fines of up to £1,000 for "failing to have proper control" of the vehicle.

The Highway Code has terms to consider for hot weather conditions.
The Highway Code has terms to consider for hot weather conditions.
British motorists could face fines of up to £1,000 for not complying with some provisions during the summer period.
British motorists could face fines of up to £1,000 for not complying with some provisions during the summer period.

To stave off the threat of drowsiness and keep drivers alert, the Highway Code says keeping vehicles "well ventilated" is an important measure to take during the hot months.

Road users also need to be aware of potentially treacherous surfaces that could arise when rain falls after a dry spell.

The Highway Code says the driving surface could become "soft" and "slippery" as a result of the change in conditions, this could impact the driver's ability to steer and brake.

The code also issues a warning about failing to slow down when dazzled by sunlight, which could have damaging consequences.

Drivers are urged to stop their vehicles completely if they are unable to see at all as a result of the bright sunlight.

Road users could be punished for not complying with the Highway Code despite it not being law, as many of the regulations have legal weight behind them.

According to the Government: "many of the rules in the Code are legal requirements, and if you disobey these rules you are committing a criminal offence.

"You may be fined, given penalty points on your licence or be disqualified from driving. In the most serious cases you may be sent to prison."