Brit holidaymakers warning as little-known beach rule could see you fined £130

The rules affect some beaches in Spain, with people needing to gain permission before continuing

Published

Brit holidaymakers have been warned that they could face fines of up to £130 because of a little-known rule.

People could be slapped with the fine for simply building sand castles on Levante beach in Spain.

The rules came into place following a Benidorm Town Hall vote in 2016.

Building sandcastles are also banned for most people in Arona and Arica in Tenerife.

Sandcastle building could lead to a £130 fine
Sandcastle building could lead to a £130 fine
Beachgoers in some Spanish regions could face the fines
Beachgoers in some Spanish regions could face the fines

In order to gain permission to build sand sculptures, people must apply for a municipal permit.

If you don’t then you are open to face the £130 penalty.

While the Italian town of Sorrento has banned people walking around in bikinis, with fines of up to £425 being handed out to those found in breach of the new rules.

Sorrento’s mayor, Massimo Coppola said the ban, which also includes bare torsos, has been brought in because exposed skin was upsetting locals.

Ms Coppola said he has recently witnessed “behaviour that is seen by the majority of people as contrary to decorum and to the decency that characterises civilised cohabitation”.

He added: “The continuation of this situation, as well as causing discomfort and unease in the resident population and among visitors, could lead to a negative judgment on the quality of life in our town, with consequences for its image and for tourism,” as quoted by the Times.