Brexit HORROR: British holidaymakers set to be charged to enter Schengen Zone under new EU rule

Visiting the Schengen Area will come at an additional cost of €7 (£6) in November 2023

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Brits will have to shell out more cash to visit popular holiday destinations as a result of a new EU directive that comes into force next year.

Visiting the Schengen Area will come at an additional cost of €7 (£6) in November 2023 as part of the European Travel Information and Authorisation System (ETIAS).

it is estimated that holidaymakers will be expensed €275 million (£240m) each year collectively.

New research suggests Brits could be caught out by the change, with only seven percent knowing the cost and the introduction date of the new visa-waiver.

Brits will have to shell out more from November 2023 to go on holiday in some popular locations.
Brits will have to shell out more from November 2023 to go on holiday in some popular locations.

Millions of Brits will have to apply for the visa-waiver each year as part of the new rule.

Filling out an online application will become a requirement for visiting the Schengen Area, which will cost each person €7 for the paperwork.

The Schengen Area guarantees free movement for most EU countries and includes popular tourist destinations such as France, Spain and Greece.

Barcelona, within the Schengen Area, is a popular location for tourists.
Barcelona, within the Schengen Area, is a popular location for tourists.

As Britain sits outside the area, UK citizens will need to pay the fee in order to travel to some of their favourite holiday sites.

Each visa-waiver will remain valid for 90 days when the rules kick into force.

The Direct Line Travel Insurance survey found 82 percent of holidaymakers feel more should be done to publicise the change in ruling.

62 percent believe the EU and UK Government should both be doing more to publicise the visa-waiver scheme, with many unaware of the changes.

Despite the added cost, many holidaymakers say they will not be put off travelling.

Tom Bishop, head of Direct Line Travel Insurance, said: “Low awareness of the EU visa-waiver scheme is concerning and shows there is not enough education around the new rules.

“People feel the authorities should be doing more to publicise the visa-waiver scheme. It seems sensible to use the remaining months until the new rules come into force to ensure people know about the visa-waiver, including how and when to apply.

“This would be especially relevant for those travellers with limited online access who may not have access to finding this information as easily as others.

“Further clarity would provide peace of mind for people planning their next holiday abroad.”