Boris Johnson holds back on green fuel drive after by-election defeats

Mr Johnson is hoping to discuss the global use of biofuel at this weekend's G7 Summit

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Boris Johnson is to hold back on pushing for motorists to use green fuel following the by-election defeats.

Mr Johnson is hoping to reduce the amount of biofuel being used across the country despite it being pivotal to the Government’s plans of becoming net zero.

Instead of biofuel, which uses wheat and maize, the PM wants the land to be used to produce more food amid the cost-of-living crisis.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson
Prime Minister Boris Johnson

Speaking on the issue, Mr Johnson said: “While Vladimir Putin continues his futile and unprovoked war in Ukraine and cravenly blockades millions of tonnes of grain, the world’s poorest people are inching closer to starvation.

“From emergency food aid to reviewing our own biofuel use, the UK is playing its part to address this pernicious global crisis.”

E10 petrol, a type of biofuel, has been widely sold at petrol stations since last summer.

But Tory backbenchers have said that E10 had raised costs for customers without finding making a huge difference.

Craig Mackinlay, chairman of the Net Zero Scrutiny Group of MPs said: "The whole E10 debate has been quite scandalous as it was, because you end up with poorer consumption and older vehicles suffering a variety of mechanical problems.

E10 fuel has become commonly used since last summer
E10 fuel has become commonly used since last summer

"We need to look at a lot of these greenwash proposals and consider: Are they truly green? Wouldn't production of foodstuffs be a more primary goal for the land?

"I think the Government would be well served to look very carefully at many of these environmental policies again.”

The Government is hoping to discuss cutting global biofuel usage by 10 percent during this weekend’s G7 summit.

It comes as Mr Johnson faces mounting pressure over his role as Prime Minister.

Earlier today Oliver Dowden resigned as chairman of the Conservative Party after it suffered two by-election defeats, saying in a letter to Prime Minister Boris Johnson that “someone must take responsibility”.

Mr Dowden cited the by-elections as prompting his resignation.

“Yesterday’s Parliamentary by-elections are the latest in a run of very poor result for our party,” Mr Dowden wrote in a letter to the Prime Minister.

“Our supporters are distressed and disappointed by recent events, and I share their feelings.

“We cannot carry on with business as usual. Somebody must take responsibility and I have concluded that, in these circumstances, it would not be right for me to remain in office.”