Angela Rayner says 'this constant charade just will not wash' in Commons probe on Chris Pincher row

Labour's Deputy Leader says the "common fault" in the Government stems from Boris Johnson

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Labour Deputy Leader Angela Rayner has taken aim at the Government during a House of Commons discussion on the Chris Pincher row.

During an urgent question probe, Cabinet Office Minister Michael Ellis took questions over the Government's handling of the situation.

Ms Rayner took to the despatch box and criticised the "constant charade" the Prime Minister oversees.

She said: "This constant charade just will not wash. These latest disturbing allegations about thew ministerial misconduct are all about abuse of power.

Angela Rayner has slammed the Government over its handling of the Chris Pincher row.
Angela Rayner has slammed the Government over its handling of the Chris Pincher row.
Chris Pincher has been accused of drunkenly groping two men at a Conservative Friends of Cyprus event.
Chris Pincher has been accused of drunkenly groping two men at a Conservative Friends of Cyprus event.

"There is one common fault with this system, and that is the power granted by this Prime Minister.

"The minister needs to remind the Prime Minister of his personal responsibility. Last week he said that he knew nothing of specific allegations about misconduct by the member for Tamworth, then he claimed he had only been aware of reports and speculation.

"The truth is out today, and that defence has been completely blown apart."

Cabinet Office minister Michael Ellis told MPs: “I ask the House to accept that bearing in mind the member in question (Chris Pincher) had been reappointed to government by a previous prime minister in 2018, and then that he’d been appointed in 2019 as a Foreign Office minister and then, crucially, he was appointed for a third time in February, I doubt whether anyone could in knowledge of those facts say that this Prime Minister should have acted otherwise than he did.

“It is the morally fair thing to do in any case to assess the situation based on evidence, not unsubstantiated rumour. It is incumbent on all of us in this House, as it is in society generally, to act fairly.

“If there is no evidence at the time, if there is no live complaint, no ongoing investigation, surely it is not unreasonable to consider making an appointment.”