Andrew Tate pictured in HANDCUFFS as he arrives at court to fight human trafficking charges - Judge brands him a 'flight risk'

The Tate brothers argue there is no evidence to support their detention.
The Tate brothers argue there is no evidence to support their detention.

Andrew and Tristan, along with two Romanian female suspects, were detained last month

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Andrew Tate and his brother Tristan were seen handcuffed together as they arrived at court this morning to appeal their 30-day detention in Romania.

Andrew and Tristan, along with two Romanian female suspects, were detained last month pending a criminal investigation into alleged human trafficking and formation of an organised crime group.

The brothers have denied any wrongdoing and have challenged the arrest warrant.

Prosecutors allege the victims were exploited by being forced to produce pornographic content for social media.

A judge recently approved the arrest of the Tate brothers.
A judge recently approved the arrest of the Tate brothers.

The judge approved their arrest in-between Christmas and New Year during the Tate brothers’ most recent court appearance.

The judge said: “The possibility that the suspects would evade investigation, leave Romania and settle in countries that do not allow extradition given their financial possibilities and public comments to that regard cannot be ignored.”

An extension of the couple’s detention could be sought by prosecutors, with a possible period of up to 180 days mooted.

They have also seized 15 luxury vehicles and over 10 properties and homes belonging to the suspects in Romania.

The brothers, however, are calling for a release from detention and argue that there is no evidence to back up claims against them.

Eugen Vidineac represents the brothers and told Romanian online newspaper Gandul that Tate portrays a certain persona on social media that cannot be “used as evidence in a legal trial”.

Mr Vidineac took to social media to say in a video that it took the pair “some time” to understand why they are in custody.

He told Gandul the defence had not been allowed to study the prosecution file for the case, saying several electronic devices were sized in April last year which were subject to computer searches.

He stated: “I will point this out from the beginning, that even up to the present moment, the criminal investigation file has not been made available to us to ensure the effective defence of our clients.

“In this sense, I would like to point out, at least from this point of view, I am also somehow amazed, there is not a single piece of evidence apart from the victim’s statement that leads to the idea that a crime of rape was committed.”

Asked what evidence there was in support of a human trafficking offence, Mr Vidineac said: “In my view, there is no evidence there either, and I’m talking about evidence leading, by itself or directly, to the formation of an opinion of reasonable suspicion regarding the commission of offences provided for and punishable by criminal law.

"In this case we are talking about human trafficking and organised crime."