Activists disrupt Priti Patel's speech to protest Rwanda plan

The Green New Deal Rising group demanded a stop to the Government's plans to send some asylum seekers to Rwanda

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A security breach, in which the Home Secretary was heckled by activists at a local Conservative party event, is under investigation.

A total of seven young people attempted to hijack the event and disrupt Priti Patel, as she addressed Conservatives in Nottinghamshire.

The protesters were demanding a halt to the Government's plans to send some asylum seekers to Rwanda.

The seven activists, from the Green New Deal Rising group, managed to infiltrate the Bassetlaw Conservatives annual Spring dinner on Friday night, after buying tickets and posing as young Conservatives.

Priti Patel was heckled during a local Conservative party event
Priti Patel was heckled during a local Conservative party event

Shortly after the Home Secretary began addressing the audience, the protesters started interrupting her.

In a video posted by the group today, the activists are seen standing up one by one and shouting at Priti Patel.

One activist shouted: "As young people wanting to live in a fair and compassionate society, we are disgusted by your treatment of refugees."

Others attending the dinner could be heard on the video shouting "Out, out, out" as the activists were led away.

The Home Office would not comment directly on the protest, but it is understood a review of security surrounding the event is underway.

The protest came as it was revealed the Government hopes to send the first asylum seekers to Rwanda as early as next week.

Home Secretary Priti Patel and Rwandan minister for foreign affairs Vincent Biruta.
Home Secretary Priti Patel and Rwandan minister for foreign affairs Vincent Biruta.

The first groups sent to the Central African nation will be single men, who are likely to notified by Home Office lawyers in the next few days.

A Home Office spokesperson said: "The world-leading Migration Partnership will overhaul our broken asylum system, which is currently costing the UK taxpayer £1.5bn a year - the highest amount in two decades.

"It means those arriving dangerously, illegally or unnecessarily, can be relocated to have their asylum claims considered and if recognised as refugees, build their life there."

However, human rights groups are already in the process of mounting multiple legal challenges, which could delay the plans for months.

So far this year, more than 7,500 people have crossed the English Channel on small boats.UK authorities have picked up around 800 in the past week, after an 11 day hiatus, due to poor weather conditions.