Martin Lewis shares 7p clothes drying hack that 'lowers energy bills'

Martin Lewis shares 7p clothes drying hack that 'lowers energy bills'
Martin Lewis shares 7p clothes drying hack that 'lowers energy bills'

As the cost of living increases and temperatures drop across the UK, more households are trying to use energy fleetingly

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Martin Lewis has revealed an easy way to dry clothes for mere pennies which does not require any heating.

As the cost of living increases and temperatures drop across the UK, households are trying to use energy fleetingly.

As the cost of living increases and temperatures drop across the UK, households are trying to use energy fleetingly.
As the cost of living increases and temperatures drop across the UK, households are trying to use energy fleetingly.

On his latest podcast, the MoneySavingExpert explained that by using a dehumidifier, households can get the same result without having to use more energy.

Once the upfront cost of purchasing the dehumidifier has been spent, the device will only cost 7p an hour to operate.

Explaining how it works, Mr. Lewis said: “Many dehumidifiers have different wattages, the one I checked out was 200 Watts. Once we know it's 200 watts and we know a Kilowatt is 1,000 watts which is how electricity tends to be priced, we know this is a fifth of a kilowatt.

"And you pay roughly 34p per kw per hour. A fifth is 7p so you're going to pay roughly 7p per hour to run a dehumidifier at 200 watts assuming it uses full power the whole time, which is generally far far cheaper than putting the heating on.

"If a dehumidifier does work for you, it will definitely have lower electricity bills, but, of course, you do have the initial capital outlay of buying a dehumidifier and see how that works for you."

Elsewhere, Mr. Lewis suggested people look at the cost effectivity of other devices, such as using an air fryer instead of an oven.
Elsewhere, Mr. Lewis suggested people look at the cost effectivity of other devices, such as using an air fryer instead of an oven.

Elsewhere, Mr. Lewis suggested people look at the cost effectivity of other devices, such as using an air fryer instead of an oven.

New analysis suggests the fryers, as well as microwaves, pressure cookers and slow cookers, have cheaper running costs than conventional ovens.

But Which? said any saving would have to be weighed against the initial outlay, with air fryers costing up to £300.

The testers found that the cheapest and quickest method of cooking a roast chicken was with a pressure cooker, costing 11p and taking 32 minutes, compared with 39p and 76 minutes in an oven, but they pointed out the cheaper method did not produce the crispy skin from normal roasting.